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The Sierra Micro Camper Trailer Looks Like You Can Ride It Going to War
What to do when everything around you seems to be crashing down? You go outdoors, that’s what. But mother nature isn’t always so welcoming either. Well, one team that’s used to mother nature’s surprises is Australian Off Road.

The Sierra Micro Camper Trailer Looks Like You Can Ride It Going to War

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This is a crew that creates a product forged in the Australian outback, a place known for its inhospitable and unforgiving lands. Australian Off Road (AOR) is one of those companies that grew from a passion to explore the outdoors safely and comfortably.

Back in 2000, Steve Budden, owner of AOR, was out looking for a camper trailer to handle his dreams. Having found none, he decided to be the creator of that vehicle. After all, if you want something done right, do it yourself. Since then, this team has been specializing in camper trailers of every rank and ability, the Sierra camper trailer being a perfect example of what they can do.

The Sierra is described as a micro camper on the manufacturer's website, but once you understand how it’s all set up and how much you can accommodate inside, you might agree that it’s anything but “micro.” Heck, a micro camper is what I would call the MyPod teardrop camper. No, this is something else entirely.

Personally, I think it is the sort of towable that could very well be used in military scenarios. Just look at it; it’s an absolute bunker of a device. Don’t believe me? The team at AOR will tell you that the interior is 100% dust-proof while being fully lockable from the inside. But before I get on about the interior, the exterior needs to be unveiled.

For a chassis, you’ll find Super Gal high tensile steel with powder coating and a 100x50 mm (3.93x1.96 in) full-length drawbar. Protecting your chassis are galvanized bash plates mounted underneath. An aluminum nose cone and a fiberglass body with insulated walls and roof complete the main construction. Overall, the trailer comes in at 950 kg (2,094 lbs) and includes a payload limit of 850 kg (1,874 lbs).

For suspension, AOR uses an independent trailing arm suspension with variable-rate coil spring and two Outback Armour off-road shocks on each wheel. 12-inch (30.48-cm) electric drum brakes and 2,500 kg (5,511-lb) bearings with 17x8 steel wheels and MT tires give you adequate control and grip.

One feature I enjoy on this towable is the kitchen. Unlike other campers that may struggle to include the kitchen inside, the AOR people seem to be true lovers of the outdoors. A large side-mounted kitchen includes everything you need to cook a meal worthy of a master chef. Completing the kitchen are a stainless-steel sink and splash back, food prep space, bring-your-own cooker and BBQ slide-outs, space to add a two-stage fridge, as well as plenty of storage and cabinetry.

For sleeping, there are a few ways you can go about it. You can leave your Sierra bare and simply use the internal double bed, or you can add a hard-shell or canvas rooftop tent for another two to four guests. That’s absolutely it. You won’t find any walkthrough spaces here. Some storage is found inside the trailer overhead the bed, with more storage under the bed.

For restroom amenities, the Sierra is to be equipped with an external shower with both hot and cold water. For anything else, you’ll need to bring your own, including a toilet. 60 liters (15.8 gallons) of water storage is available, but an option for an extra 140 liters (37 gallons) exists. There’s also a river access system that bypasses all water tanks.

Since you’ll be out and about for quite some time with the Sierra, plenty of technical and utility systems are in place. Also provided are an 150-amp lithium battery, 12-volt sockets and USB ports, Finscan Powercore 30 RV automation and battery management system, and external solar panel input.

As far as pricing goes, AOR doesn’t mention it on their website, but other local dealers are throwing these at you for $42,500, but that’s most likely Australian dollars, which is the equivalent of $32,850 at current exchange rates. With the number of extra options you can add to this sucker, you’ll probably run into the $40,000 range.

Personally, I like to camp with a knife, flint, and a raging fire by my side, maybe a string parameter with a bell here and there, for some extra safety. If I ever wanted to step up my game in terms of comfort while still being immersed in the outdoors, I'd consider the Sierra for sure.



 
 
 
 
 

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