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Exposed Plymouth GTX 426 Hemi "Subtly" Screams That Something Is Digitally Amiss

Unlike other American high-performance legends, the upscale mid-size Plymouth GTX muscle car did not enjoy the perks of having a humongous lease of life. Instead, it had to do the best of a 1966 to 1971 production run. Still, it managed to insinuate itself in the hearts and minds of many fans.
Plymouth GTX 426 Hemi exposed old school rendering by abimelecdesign 11 photos
Plymouth GTX 426 Hemi exposed old school rendering by abimelecdesignPlymouth GTX 426 Hemi exposed old school rendering by abimelecdesignPlymouth GTX 426 Hemi exposed old school rendering by abimelecdesignPlymouth GTX 426 Hemi exposed old school rendering by abimelecdesignPlymouth GTX 426 Hemi exposed old school rendering by abimelecdesignPlymouth GTX 426 Hemi exposed old school rendering by abimelecdesignPlymouth GTX 426 Hemi exposed old school rendering by abimelecdesignPlymouth GTX 426 Hemi exposed old school rendering by abimelecdesignPlymouth GTX 426 Hemi exposed old school rendering by abimelecdesignPlymouth GTX 426 Hemi exposed old school rendering by abimelecdesign
That was not extremely hard to do for the B-body Mopar introduced by Plymouth back in 1967 on the basics of the Belvedere model. It rocked its “gentleman’s muscle car” position with 426 Hemi or 440ci grace, and it even featured no less than three redesigns over its short lifespan.

Alas, fans who remember the GTX as a four-headlight affair will immediately notice that something is amiss with this bare-naked, massively exposed Plymouth GTX 426 Hemi, that travels the imagination land of Abimelec Arellano, a virtual artist better known as abimelecdesign on social media. The pixel master has again prepared a marvelous wishful thinking project – if you do not mind those ardent Mopar purists might run amuck crying their outrage.

But they should not, since no actual GTXs got hurt in making this digital project, and the author’s main gist was not to send them into a diehard frenzy but rather to play the old-school muscle car trope in a signature, virtual way. The explanation behind this idea is simple, as the CGI expert says he “just can’t get enough of how good old muscle cars look sitting low on big, meaty vintage Goodyears.”

So, he took the unsuspecting Plymouth and gave it a virtual treatment with a few twists. These include the extended upwards fenders, a big motor sticking out freely as there is no hood to take away its spotlight, meaty tires, and a bare/exposed setup for the front end that also includes no windows and a massive roll cage to signal this Plymouth means digital business.

Naturally, there is also one last touch that could set the Mopar crowd on fire – the headlights are Holley’s single “retro bright units.” So, is this your vintage cup of CGI muscle car tea or not?




 
 
 
 
 

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