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2021 Ford Bronco Maverick Name Apparently Confirmed for Baby SUV

What were you doing in May 2018? Among others, yours truly reported that Ford went to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office with the Maverick nameplate for “automobiles” and “exterior badges for automobiles.”
2021 Ford Bronco Maverick Name Apparently Confirmed for Baby SUV 12 photos
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This wouldn’t be the first time the Blue Oval utilized Maverick for series-production vehicles, and at the time, rumors suggested the nameplate would be employed by “the yet-to-be-named off-road” small SUV.

Teased in March 2018, the Bronco’s baby brother has been confirmed by sources and the carparazzi to be an Escape with off-road chops, a boxy exterior, and a slightly different exterior from the compact crossover that Ford calls Kuga in Europe. The question is, is the newcomer called Maverick?

FORD PARTS GUY posted a picture of the automaker’s parts system on the Bronco6G forums, and the answer to the previous question is apparently affirmative. The year is listed as 2020, though that may refer to the calendar year instead of the model year.

As a side note, the Escape was called Maverick long ago in a few parts of the world. This leads us to believe that Bronco Sport is no longer the case, and that’s for the better because Ford would’ve copied the Discovery and Discovery Sport nomenclature of Land Rover.

Care to guess what’s hiding under the skin?

Scheduled to enter production in August 2020, the Bronco Maverick rides on the C2 vehicle architecture of the Escape, Kuga, and Focus. CX430 is the project’s codename, and knowing the platform’s current applications, it shouldn’t come as a surprise if Ford offers the 1.5-liter EcoBoost as the standard mill.

As opposed to what 1.5-liter EcoBoost used to mean, the Dragon engine family consists of three-cylinder turbo powerplants like the ones in the Escape, Fiesta ST, and Focus. An evolution of the 1.0-liter EcoBoost, the Dragon could be joined by the 2.0- and 2.3-liter EcoBoost to please more demanding customers. A hybrid and plug-in hybrid are also possible, but only time will tell what kind of powertrains the compact off-roader will get.

It came to our attention last year that Ford won’t sell the body-on-frame Bronco and Bronco Maverick in the European Union, so don’t expect any turbo diesels under the hood. As for transmissions, you can bet a tenner that the smaller sibling will get an eight-speed auto with a torque converter.

 
 
 
 
 

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