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Unmolested Barn Find: 1969 Mercury Cougar XR7 Convertible Looks Great from the Right Angle

The Mercury Cougar adventure started in 1967 with impressive sales, as the company managed to ship over 150,000 units. In 1968, however, the figures declined substantially to just 113,000 units, with the drop continuing for one more year.
1969 Mercury Cougar 13 photos
1969 Mercury Cougar XR7 Convertible1969 Mercury Cougar XR7 Convertible1969 Mercury Cougar XR7 Convertible1969 Mercury Cougar XR7 Convertible1969 Mercury Cougar XR7 Convertible1969 Mercury Cougar XR7 Convertible1969 Mercury Cougar XR7 Convertible1969 Mercury Cougar XR7 Convertible1969 Mercury Cougar XR7 Convertible1969 Mercury Cougar XR7 Convertible1969 Mercury Cougar XR7 Convertible1969 Mercury Cougar XR7 Convertible
The Mercury Cougar barely sold 100,000 units in 1969, with the final year of the generation collapsing to just a little over 72,000 cars.

The first-year Cougar used the same V8s available on the Mustang, with Mercury then further refining this approach for the next models. In 1969, for instance, the 289 (4.7-liter) was ditched, with the standard unit now coming in the form of the 351 (5.7-liter) Windsor developing 250 horsepower with a 2-barrel carburetor.

The 4-barrel version, also installed on the XR7 convertible that we have here, produced 290 horsepower.

On the other hand, the V8 on this Cougar is no longer running, and partially to blame is, without a doubt, the long time of sitting. eBay seller nelmor_2035 says this car is a barn find, and based purely on the provided photos, the storage conditions haven’t necessarily been the worst. But they haven’t been the best either.

Depending on the angle, this ’69 Cougar looks pretty good, but at further inspection, it starts to show its real weaknesses. There’s indeed some rust on the body, and it all gets worse in the trunk, where some massive patching is going to be required.

The interior looks rather clean, and the owner of the car says everything is still there. And what’s more, this Cougar is still an unmolested 1969 convertible, so it’s basically a survivor that only requires some major TLC before returning to the head-turner condition.

Sold as part of a no-reserve auction, the Cougar certainly doesn’t come cheap. The seller expects to get at least $8,000 for it, so it remains to be seen if anyone is willing to pay that much for a 1969 model.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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