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This RV Was Turned Into a Spacious Jack of All Trades Mobile Home

Mobile living is the new trend when it comes to choosing accommodation. Whether that's due to the pandemic teaching people that routine can make you crazy, a willingness to cut down on living costs, or just a higher availability in remote jobs is hard to tell. But one thing is sure, people are coming up with many creative ways to live life on the road.
Bumper Pull RV Turned Mobile Home 20 photos
Photo: Youtube / Tiny Home Tours
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In this case, the approach of choice is that bigger is better, and it's hard to argue with that when seeing what can be done inside a 30-foot Keystone Bullet bumper pull RV turned mobile home. Granted, choosing to opt for a larger build does have some inherent limitations, as no matter what is used to tow an RV, it can never go where a four-wheel-drive van can.

However, it can get close enough, and having a vehicle that tows the mobile home allows some flexibility. On the one hand, a car provides additional storage space, which always comes in handy when living in a mobile home. Then there's the fact that choosing this option allows the owner to stay in RV parks for extended periods, creating the opportunity to take in the scenery in every new place they go. A nomad could also leave the RV parked in a beautiful and remote camping spot and take the car to get closer to the start of a hiking trail.

But the most crucial aspect of choosing an RV over a van is space, which is abundant. Compared to the cramped interior of even the longest Mercedes Sprinter, this 30-foot keystone actually feels like a home. There is a natural feeling of separation between rooms (although, in this case, there are no physical walls) instead of everything being a compromising amalgamation. That's not to say that van conversions don't have a unique appeal, but sometimes that little bit of extra space can make a world of difference.

So, let's look at this mobile home and see how things have been set up. The first thing of note here is that it's split into three main sections and four rooms, with the multi-purpose living room/office combo taking up the most space.

Bumper Pull RV Turned Mobile Home
Photo: Youtube / Tiny Home Tours
The other three rooms are the kitchen with an adjoining dinette, the bedroom, and the bathroom, which is the only enclosed area in this otherwise open-floor concept. And all of these areas share a similar aesthetic, with rich woods contrasting the light color palette used on the walls, while plenty of natural light amplifies how spacious this RV feels.

The multi-purpose room is probably the most exciting area here, despite the relatively lackluster décor. And that's because it serves as the office and work area inside this mobile home, which is great. After all, having a separation of spaces lets people enter different mindsets depending on which room they're in.

On top of that, it's also hugely spacious. The owner of this RV removed the bunk beds that were previously used and turned the empty space on one side into a large storage area by placing some shelves masked by a curtain. A corner chair and a desk are placed on the opposite wall, along with a play area for the cat, while the space in between is left empty and serves as the designated yoga spot.

Up next is the kitchen, which, yet again, is generous, as would be expected from an RV. It is not exceptional, as having a lot of space means there's no need to improvise ingenious solutions to make everything fit. But it is well equipped, boasting everything that would be present in a traditional house. There's plenty of countertop space, a deep sink, microwave, propane-powered stove and oven combo, and even a range hood, which is unusual for mobile homes.

Bumper Pull RV Turned Mobile Home
Photo: Youtube / Tiny Home Tours
Another unusual item is the fridge, which is a regular house fridge, only able to run on electricity, as opposed to the dedicated RV options that can also use propane. Granted, it is relatively large, able to fit a lot of groceries for extended off-grid trips. Keeping that theme, the rest of the kitchen also boasts plenty of storage, having a myriad of cabinets, both on the wall and on the floor.

Speaking of camping off-grid, this RV is more than capable of doing so. There's also a 30-gallon freshwater tank, and while that sounds small, it's not an issue as additional water jugs and propane tanks can be carried in the pick-up truck used to pull this RV. There are also solar panels mounted on top, although there is no mention of their capacity or the batteries they charge. But considering the sheer amount of space available, there's reason to think they are pretty capable.

The dinette takes up the opposite wall to the kitchen, and it's relatively simple, with a fixed table and a two-person bench that has a storage compartment built into it. One fantastic feature of this area is that it's great for hosting guests, as there's also an extendable couch next to the kitchen cabinets.

This area directly faces the bedroom due to the open floor plan of this RV, but there is a floor-to-ceiling cabinet separating the two. This cabinet also helps when it comes to entertaining guests as it hosts a music/DVD player and some board games and puzzles.

Bumper Pull RV Turned Mobile Home
Photo: Youtube / Tiny Home Tours
Moving to the bedroom, it is yet again a simple affair. There is a short queen-sized bed as well as plenty of cabinets both above the bed and flanking it, which is an excellent upgrade from what a van would offer. In fact, the entire area is miles above what would be present in a compact build, as it feels like an actual bedroom, a place where you only go to sleep and does not feel like it's part of your everyday living space.

The bathroom is the only area left, which is impressive for a mobile home. It has all the bells and whistles like a regular flushing toilet, cabinets with a countertop and vanity on top, a medicine cabinet with a mirror, and most importantly, a shower that is separated from this. But nothing is perfect, and there's a price to pay for this comfort, as the toilet has a 30-gallon blackwater tank that has to be periodically emptied.

Overall, this build feels cohesive, spacious, and flexible. It's the kind of mobile home that can be considered a jack of all trades. A potential nomad can either choose to take things slow and spend a few months in RV parks taking in the scenery of each new area they explore or just stop to refill and then go back to off-grid camping in nature.

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About the author: Bogdan Bebeselea
Bogdan Bebeselea profile photo

As a kid, Bogdan grew up handing his dad the tools needed to work on his old Citroen and asking one too many questions about everything happening inside the engine bay. Naturally, this upbringing led Bogdan to become an engineer, but thanks to Top Gear, The Fast and the Furious series, and racing video games, a passion for automotive entertainment was ignited.
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