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New Range Rover Gets Its First Recall, Front Crash Sensors May Malfunction

Temporarily sold alongside the old Range Rover, the new Range Rover was introduced for the 2022 model year to a mostly positive reception. Some things, however, never change about Land Rover products, which brings us to the luxury utility vehicle’s first safety recall in the United States.
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Last month, the British automaker inspected a vehicle that was found to have both front crash sensor fasteners incorrectly installed. A plant-wide investigation was promptly instigated, culminating in a stop shipment issued on April 5th. Further assessment revealed a possibility of vehicles being affected beyond the control of the Solihull facility in the UK.

The Recall Determination Committee was informed that certain vehicles may not have the front crash sensor fasteners installed to the required torque level. If these fasteners become loose, the active restraints system may operate incorrectly in the event of a crash, increasing the risk of injury. Land Rover also notes that inadvertent front airbag deployment is a possibility.

Thankfully for the British automaker and the peeps who are currently driving the brand-new Range Rover, no accidents or injuries have been reported as a result of this condition. The unreasonable safety risk will be addressed in due time. Technicians will be informed on May 24th to tighten the front crash sensor fasteners to the correct torque. Customers, on the other hand, will be notified by first-class mail on or before July 8th.

The part numbers for the crash sensor and fastener are M8E2-14B006-DA and W780178 SJ07, as per the attached report. No fewer than 19 examples of the full-size luxury sport utility vehicle are called back, vehicles that were assembled at the Solihull plant between February 2nd and February 22nd.

Available in standard- and long-wheelbase flavors, the Range Rover is currently going for $104,500 sans destination charge for the most basic of specifications. 21-inch wheels come standard, together with 13.1-inch touchscreen infotainment, electronic air suspension, and a mild-hybrid sixer that puts out 395 horsepower (400 PS) and 406 pound-feet (550 Nm). At the other end of the spectrum, Land Rover offers a twin-turbo V8 rated at 523 hp (530 PS).

 Download attachment: 2022 Range Rover recall (PDF)

 
 
 
 
 

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