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GMC Syclone Digital Restomod Sports Boxy LEDs and Hood Scoop

For the most part, cars designed for rich people go up in value while those made for us plebs only depreciate. But there are exceptions in both scenarios. The GMC Syclone is a small, old truck, so it should be cheap, but people are probably willing to spend used Ferrari money to get one in mint condition.
GMC Syclone Digital Restomod Sports Boxy LEDs and Hood Scoop 6 photos
GMC Syclone Digital Restomod Sports Boxy LEDs and Hood ScoopGMC Syclone Digital Restomod Sports Boxy LEDs and Hood ScoopGMC Syclone Digital Restomod Sports Boxy LEDs and Hood ScoopGMC Syclone Digital Restomod Sports Boxy LEDs and Hood ScoopGMC Syclone Digital Restomod Sports Boxy LEDs and Hood Scoop
Used Syclone trucks don't come up for sale very often, but Bring a Trailer says it has sold one for $50,000 back in 2019, and there's currently one in Florida for $64,000. So, as we said, it's bordering used Ferrari territory. But what makes this such a special vehicle to have?

Well, for starters, it's about 30 years old. This means it's at the perfect age for people to see it through rose-tinted glasses and maybe spend some of that hard-earned cash on their childhood dream truck. And today, we're going to look at a rendering which tries to imagine a Syclone restomod, as you'd see for the older muscle cars.

The Syclone
is really just a hot rod in a different format, cramming mega power into a small body. This was the era of the forgotten muscle truck war. Buick engineers put a Grand National engine and put it into the S10 compact truck, but neither Chevy nor Buick wanted it. However, GMC saw the potential and approved the limited-edition sports vehicle.

The rendering created by wb.artist20 attempts to put restomod ideas into the GMC design, making small changes that make the truck better and more expensive-looking. Probably the most noticeable change is a set of square LED lights, which play off the boxiness of the design. It also receives a bigger grille with a honeycomb pattern, as you see on trucks made nowadays. It's an interesting departure from the billet elements you see on restomods, but 3D printing is indeed the next stage of customization.




 
 
 
 
 

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