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Glamorous Triumph Bonneville Circe Finds There’s No Such Thing as Too Much Brass or Chrome

Even someone who’s not particularly keen on motorcycles would stop to stare at this beauty for a minute.
Triumph Bonneville Circe 38 photos
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In ancient Greek mythology, Circe is a minor goddess and enchantress, daughter of the sun deity Helios and Oceanid nymph Perse. With extensive knowledge of herbal potions, as well as some good old-fashioned sorcery, she had the ability to turn her enemies into animals – an ordeal portrayed in several pieces of literature, including Homer’s Odyssey.

Homer tells us she’s “a dreadful goddess with lovely hair and human speech,” while Apollonius (another Greek author of ancient times) describes Circe’s eyes as being golden and emitting bright rays of light. Now, the custom Triumph Bonneville christened with the same name, won’t be transforming its rivals into pigs, like the sorceress did to Odysseus’ crew on the island of Aeaea, but its sheer beauty might just have you spellbound!

Built by Tamarit Motorcycles with a heavy emphasis on Baroque styling, the bike in question had once been a bone-stock carbureted Bonnie from 2004. It now features a ton of chrome and brass finishes as a nod to the Greek goddess’ blazing golden eyes, and there’s something truly angelic about its overall character. Essentially, this thing is nothing less than a work of art.

Triumph Bonneville Circe
Coming up with such masterpieces has been Tamarit’s specialty for several years, though, so you’ll find over 120 distinct projects in their portfolio. This is a pretty astonishing number, for sure, but it begins to sound even more impressive when you consider that no two entities are alike. Oh, and it might be worth mentioning the firm’s only been around since 2015, just to give you an idea of the pace at which the Spanish experts operate.

As there’s a lot for us to cover on their mythologically-named, somewhat bobber-esque Bonneville, let’s dive straight in and examine how the transformation process played out. Starting at the front, we find a very classy springer fork arrangement accompanied by a retro-style headlamp up top. The cockpit area bears an aftermarket handlebar akin to that of a broad-tracker but fitted upside-down to achieve a slammed demeanor.

Shiny levers, Biltwell grips, and Motogadget switches make up the hardware touched by the rider's hands, while instrumentation comes in the form of a minute speedometer installed low down on the right fork leg. All these modules, along with the unobtrusive bar-end blinkers, are fantastic touches bordering on drool-worthy, but things get considerably wilder out back.

For starters, the motorcycle’s swingarm was lengthened and modded to accommodate a monoshock setup, atop which you’ll see a cantilevered seat pan curving upwards toward the rear. The gorgeous saddle upholstery extends onto the fuel tank and is mimicked by the knee pads, forming a seamless flow to tie everything together coherently.

Triumph Bonneville Circe
Rounding out the rear-end tweaks are dual LED taillights and an oval Circe badge, along with a fiberglass fender hanging on a drilled and brass-cloaked bracket. The machine crawls on a new set of wheels, the southernmost of which comes with solid disc plates that look the business. Both hoops wear Continental tires and are brought to a halt via wave rotors.

You might've noticed the Bonneville's gas tank is still stock, but it's now embellished with Tamarit emblems and a flat filler cap beside the brown leather pads we mentioned earlier. After they'd polished the engine cases to a mirror finish, the guys proceeded to add K&N air filters and high-mounted exhaust pipework made of stainless steel. The headers flow into dual slash-cut mufflers topped with a brass grill.

Beneath the motorcycle’s parallel-twin lies a bolt-on sump guard from Tamarit’s own aftermarket catalog, and there are fresh foot pegs sitting further back. Lastly, Circe’s fuel tank and rear fender received a delicious coat of white paint, providing a perfect contrast to the abundance of chrome, brass, and brown leather found throughout the rest of the build.

 
 
 
 
 

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