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Custom Moto Guzzi V 50 Is Dripping With Style, Embraces the Retro Cafe Racer Spirit

This year marks the 100th anniversary of Moto Guzzi. Given the special occasion, Deus Ex Machina Japan could not miss the chance to honor the Mandello brand with a cafe racer conversion of the classic V 50. Meet the Beretta, a stylish motorcycle that runs with the same old heart but has a new spirit.
Custom Moto Guzzi V 50 gets a retro cafe racer look 15 photos
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Originally introduced in 1977, after Alessandro de Tomaso bought the company, the V 50 was an appreciated model due to its lightweight, slim frame, and ability to run at high revs. It was Moto Guzzi's small-block representative, with a displacement ranging from 350cc to 750cc.

The donor that we're talking about here is a 1980 V 50 that kept its heart intact, as the shop managed to find a bike in pretty good condition. Its original main frame, swing arm, 18-inch wheels, and front fork configuration were also retained.

Deus Ex Machina Japan's bike builder, Tomoyuki Soeda, put his skilled hands to work in order to transform the Beretta into an American motorcycle that still kept its fine Italian style. He focused on the fuel tank, rear frame, headlight area, and tail section. Soeda swapped the original Dell'Orto carbs that made the bike's V-twin breathe better with a pair of Keihin FCR36 new ones.

To nail the cafe-racer style, a slim fuel tank was designed to complement the Moto Guzzi "Small Block" V-twin, an engine that at the time delivered no more than 45 hp at 7,500 rpm. With this redesigned fuel tank, the rider has a better view of the symmetrically protruding exhaust pipes from the twin-cylinder heads.

When viewed horizontally from the side, the rear end, comprising of the seat and seat cowl, pursues a sleeker and more elegant shape than the original frame line, creating two separate body lines. The seat cowl is made of steel tubes, similar to a Ducati trellis frame, and is hidden by welded aluminum panels.

As for the paintwork on this piece, the dark green color on the tank contrasts beautifully with the cream leather seat, the gold pinstripe that you have to really squint your eyes to see, and the gold paint used in the Deus Ex Machina logo. The style on this thing leaves no room for arguing as the shop has managed to roll out yet another fine custom-build motorcycle.

 
 
 
 
 

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