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Motorcycle Road Racing: Where Do I Start?
For the past two years, I have actively been involved in motorsports again. I've always had a thing for motorcycles, and going to the race track is the only place where you can truly push one to its limits. Whereas in the past I've worked a lot with professional racers in their 30s or older, now my focus is on supporting junior riders.

Motorcycle Road Racing: Where Do I Start?

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In two years, I've interacted closely with over 30 young riders, ages between 9 to 18 years old. And I often find myself talking to parents that have considered signing their kids up for a racing program. Even more often I get messages from kids that are nuts about motorcycles. Most of them still see professional motorcycle racing as a distant dream. And that happens especially with children coming from families with modest incomes.The secret to getting ahead is getting started
But let's cut to the chase here and see how you can turn your dream into reality. There are several things you need to consider. First of all, if you're going to make it in the world of motorsports, you're going to need all the support you can get. If you're still a minor, then you should first seek out help from your parents. If one of them happens to ride a motorcycle or be involved in motorsports already, it should be easy for you to get their attention.

But if that's not the case, don't worry just yet. It's important to understand that riding a motorcycle at the race track, even at what most people would consider ridiculous speeds, is still a lot safer than doing the same thing on a public road. Because on a race track, there aren't any pedestrians, stray dogs or cats, potholes, curbs, or anything else that may be a hazard if you happen to crash. Race tracks have run-off areas meant to slow you down safely.

The racing team I'm a part of always insists on the idea that any rider who wants to turn professional should forget about riding on the streets. But we'll talk about that some other time. If your parents still don't agree with the idea, try to continue educating them on the matter. This next step is crucial whether they've decided to support you from the beginning or not. You need to find the right environment to make the first step towards professional racing.Alone, we can do so little; together we, can do so much.
I would suggest you look up all the racing teams and schools in a 500-mile (804 km) radius. Start asking questions! Get to know the riders, ask for directions! When you come across someone willing to help, have your parents contact them for more information. Before committing to any expenses, be sure to look at some reviews and go meet them in person. Becoming a professional rider is not all fun and games, and you should not take things lightly.

The road from being a rookie to becoming a championship winner is a long one, and it's filled with blood, sweat, and tears. This isn't meant to scare you off, but to prepare you for what is up ahead. Once you've managed to find a team or school that seems suitable to your needs, ask for their advice on the next steps. Don't start buying riding gear or a motorcycle without talking to them first. They might have their fleet of school bikes, and you might have to wear team colors or gear.



I'm not sure about other racing schools, but the one I'm volunteering for will take on riders of any age or level of experience. I've seen kids that haven't even ridden a bike before getting used to riding a motorcycle within hours of their first lesson. The same kids have progressed to riding a 300cc racing motorcycle on the track within days from their debut. One very important thing to remember when you're starting: don't overdo it! Don't try to go faster than your skills allow you to!All things are difficult before they are easy
Our coach always instructs our junior riders to go out and just have fun. Go at your own pace at first. Get comfortable with the motorcycle. And remember to be as calm and calculated in everything you do. Being rough with the controls won't make you go faster, it'll just have you fall off the bike at a certain point. Any good coach should be able to tell what you're doing wrong and right even by observing you from afar.

There's one extremely important aspect you need to remember if you're going to start down this path. If your parents aren't multimillionaires, at a certain point in your career, you are going to need sponsors. There's a saying that goes around that sounds like this "How do you become a millionaire in motorsports? By starting as a billionaire!". But if you're going to get sponsors, you need to be able to offer them something in return.



And don't for a second think that you can get away with just some stickers on the race bike and some branding on your riding gear. If you or the people around you aren't at all experienced with sponsorship chasing and management, you will need a manager. It's either that or educate yourself to the level where you can at least get some minor deals at first until you can afford to have a manager.

You need to understand that being a winner alone is not going to guarantee you any major deals in the future. Look at some of the professional athletes that have reached a certain level. People like Ken Block, for instance. If you manage to make a name for yourself and create a strong online presence, that will most likely attract some interest from various companies. Don't ever let anyone say no to your dreams, and never stop fighting for them as distant as they may seem! Also, I'll get more into this topic in a future article, so keep your eyes open for that!

 
 
 
 
 

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