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This Is Possibly the First Tesla Bought by Hertz That Was Destroyed in a Crash

BYD announced on October 4 that SIXT will buy 100,000 of its electric cars until 2028. Tesla anticipated that sort of deal when it signed a contract with Hertz for the same amount of EVs. It is no surprise some of these cars would get involved in crashes, but Keef Wivaneff probably found the first total loss while looking for new “whompy wheel” cases. He shared this one on Twitter.
2022 Tesla Model Y bought by Hertz did not last for long: it took it only 913 miles to get a salvage title 15 photos
2022 Tesla Model Y bought by Hertz did not last for long: it took it only 913 miles to get a salvage title2022 Tesla Model Y bought by Hertz did not last for long: it took it only 913 miles to get a salvage title2022 Tesla Model Y bought by Hertz did not last for long: it took it only 913 miles to get a salvage title2022 Tesla Model Y bought by Hertz did not last for long: it took it only 913 miles to get a salvage title2022 Tesla Model Y bought by Hertz did not last for long: it took it only 913 miles to get a salvage title2022 Tesla Model Y bought by Hertz did not last for long: it took it only 913 miles to get a salvage title2022 Tesla Model Y bought by Hertz did not last for long: it took it only 913 miles to get a salvage title2022 Tesla Model Y bought by Hertz did not last for long: it took it only 913 miles to get a salvage title2022 Tesla Model Y bought by Hertz did not last for long: it took it only 913 miles to get a salvage title2022 Tesla Model Y bought by Hertz did not last for long: it took it only 913 miles to get a salvage title2022 Tesla Model Y bought by Hertz did not last for long: it took it only 913 miles to get a salvage title2022 Tesla Model Y bought by Hertz did not last for long: it took it only 913 miles to get a salvage title2022 Tesla Model Y bought by Hertz did not last for long: it took it only 913 miles to get a salvage title2022 Tesla Model Y bought by Hertz did not last for long: it took it only 913 miles to get a salvage title
The 2022 Model Y you see in these pictures had only 913 miles (1,469 kilometers) when something quite serious happened to it. Copart put the vehicle for sale in Fresno, California, and said it belonged to Hertz. The description of the primary damages it has suffered is quite telling: “all over.” Indeed.

The collision entirely removed the front of the Model Y. The crash boxes seem to have been cut, and the heat pump is exposed. Some pictures reveal that the frunk bucket was placed inside the electric SUV. The front left wheel is gone, and all airbags apart from the curtain units on the right side were deployed. The body is twisted and seems to have crashed on the rear left side, which broke the rear hatch window. As you may imagine, this Tesla is a write-off.

When Hertz bought it, it cost $73,823. Sadly, the page offers no description of what happened or if a Hertz customer totaled it. That is the most likely hypothesis. So far, the wreckage got no bids. The battery pack alone might be worth quite some money if the crash did not damage it as much as it destroyed the rest of the body, which is highly doubtful.

With multiple massive purchase contracts popping up with rental car companies, this is probably something we will see more often: not only due to human behavior in traffic but also because massive sales will get more popular. According to Tyson Jominy, from J.D. Power, fleet sales have been providing the highest industry profit in the last two and a half years. The reason is simple: rental agencies now agree to pay the manufacturer's suggested retail prices (MSRP) for the vehicles. Dealerships purchase them for values below that for obvious reasons.

 
 
 
 
 

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