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Meet the Spider, KrisBiker’s Heavily Customized Honda CB750 F2
It looks like Peter Parker has a mechanical soulmate!

Meet the Spider, KrisBiker’s Heavily Customized Honda CB750 F2

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The Spider’s story begins as a regular 1995 model in Honda’s CB750 F2 family. A Polish motorcycle surgeon, by the name of Krzysztof Rogalinski, tackled the painstaking task of breathing new life into this weary two-wheeler. Needless to say, his spectacular creation is (almost) an entirely different animal. However, for comparison’s sake, we’ll start by having a quick look at what the original bike was capable of.

While the MY '95 CB750 F2 wasn’t exactly what you’d refer to as impressive or groundbreaking in any way, it wasn’t entirely disappointing either. Come on folks, we’ll have to at least give it some credit for the latter, right?

It is put in motion by a four-stroke DOHC inline-four engine, with a generous displacement of 747cc. At 8,500 revs, the air-cooled mill would generate up to 73 hp, accompanied by 46 pound-feet (62 Nm) of torque output at 7,500 rpm.

Additionally, this piece of machinery comes equipped with four 34 mm (1.34 inches) carburetors that help it breathe with ease. As to CB750 F2’s drivetrain, a five-speed manual gearbox allows for the powerplant’s force to be handed over to the rear wheel by means of a chain final drive.

Up front, the entire structure rests on a pair of 41 mm (1.6 inches) telescopic forks, joined by dual adjustable shock absorbers on the opposite end. The front wheel wears twin 296 mm (11.65 inches) brake discs, coupled with two-piston calipers. On the other hand, you will find a single 240 mm (9.45 inches) rotor and one-piston caliper at the rear.

I know, you’re probably thinking this whole shebang sounds painfully average, and I’m not about to disagree. Hang in there though, we’re just about to dive into the exciting part!

Krzysztof Rogalinski (aka KrisBiker) specializes mainly in restoring motorcycles of all shapes and sizes. However, he decided to pursue a more creative undertaking and blessed a mediocre ‘95 Honda CB750 F2 with a welcome makeover. As such, this undistinguished machine morphed into a groovy cafe racer that’d look right at home in a Spider-Man movie.

In January, I completely restored a Russian Ural M63 in 30 days using 98% original parts,” explains Rogalinski. “I thought a cafe racer project would be a walk in the park. I was wrong.

Firstly, he modified the bike’s frame to accommodate a ‘70s CB550 F’s fuel tank, as well as a one-off saddle that matches the desired aesthetic. The gifted craftsman continued by installing a fresh set of Gixxer forks, along with a pair of Ohlins shocks on the other end.

The Spider rolls on 17-inch Excel multi-spoked wheels, hugged by Pirelli’s top-of-the-line Night Dragon tires. At the front, the wheel is dressed in dual 318 mm (12.5 inches) floating discs and Brembo brake pads, coupled with a CBX750’s caliper and a single brand-new brake disc at the rear.

In terms of F2’s inline-four powerplant, Rogalinski treated it to a full restoration and recalibrated its carburetors to optimize their behavior. To top it all off, he honored the 747cc mill with a splendid satin black finish, as well as an aftermarket four-into-one exhaust system that guarantees a healthy performance upgrade.

Next, he relocated the electric components to Spider’s modified swingarm and provided his creation with a full LED lighting kit. Besides a considerable weight reduction of 46 lbs (21 kg), the reborn Honda CB750 F2 prides itself with Accel clip-on handlebars – a must-have item for any respectable cafe racer.

And there we have it. Now that we’ve wrapped this up, why not pay KrisBiker a visit on his Facebook page and show him some love for his two-wheeled marvel?

 
 
 
 
 

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