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Ken Block Gets Hit by Bad Luck at Pikes Peak, 1,400-HP Porsche Is off the Grid

There is one simple way of becoming a millionaire in motorsports: you have to start as a billionaire! As cruel as that might sound, anyone who has ever raced at a professional level will know that to be true. I've seen drivers go through three, $30,000 engines in three days at drift events. I've seen riders crash their brand new motorcycle on their first lap. Once you're out on the track, anything can and will happen.
Ken Block Gets Hit With Bad Luck at Pikes Peak, 1,400-HP Porsche Is Off the Grid 10 photos
Ken Block Gets Hit With Bad Luck at Pikes Peak, 1,400-HP Porsche Is Off the GridKen Block Gets Hit With Bad Luck at Pikes Peak, 1,400-HP Porsche Is Off the GridKen Block Gets Hit With Bad Luck at Pikes Peak, 1,400-HP Porsche Is Off the GridKen Block Gets Hit With Bad Luck at Pikes Peak, 1,400-HP Porsche Is Off the GridKen Block Gets Hit With Bad Luck at Pikes Peak, 1,400-HP Porsche Is Off the GridKen Block Gets Hit With Bad Luck at Pikes Peak, 1,400-HP Porsche Is Off the GridKen Block Gets Hit With Bad Luck at Pikes Peak, 1,400-HP Porsche Is Off the GridKen Block Gets Hit With Bad Luck at Pikes Peak, 1,400-HP Porsche Is Off the GridKen Block Gets Hit With Bad Luck at Pikes Peak, 1,400-HP Porsche Is Off the Grid
And Ken Block probably knows that better than most people. Over the past decade, he's crashed multiple times, and he has gone through plenty of mechanical failures. It's never an easy pill to swallow, and it's particularly more annoying when it happens just before the main event.

This week, some of the fastest drivers in the world have gathered in Colorado for the 100th running of the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb. The first race was held back in 1916, and Rea Lentz was the fastest man to the top with a time of 20 minutes and 55 seconds.

The event was put on hold during World War I and World War II, but organizers, fans, and drivers came back for more high-speed action afterward. Gradually, the gravel sections have been replaced by paved ones. Starting in 2012, all the races on the famous mountain have been held on asphalt.

And that's something hardcore fans of the event don't agree with entirely. The current record was set in 2018, as Romain Dumas managed to dip below the 8-minute mark in the Volkswagen I.D.R. Meanwhile, motorcycles have also been banned from the Race to the Clouds.

With 156 turns, a length of 12.42 miles (19.99 km), and an elevation increase of 4,720 ft (1,440 meters), this event is not for the faint of heart. And everyone was excited to see Ken Block going at it in his new race car: the Hoonipigasus.

The 1,400-hp pink Porsche was unveiled about a month ago, and it only weighs in at about 2,204 lbs (1,000 kg). The Hoonigan legend arrived at Pikes Peak three days ago and gave the world a glimpse of the Hoonipigasus sitting next to his Audi RS e-tron GT.

But things went south quite fast for the 54-year-old race driver from California. Two separate engine components failed within two days, giving him space for little to no practice for Sunday's main event. With just one timed run of 2 minutes and 57 seconds, he was nowhere near as fast as Rhys Millen.

But he was considerably faster than Ralf Christensson in the Radical RXC GT3. At this stage, the team was left with just one option. With the car back in the garage, the engine was removed for a thorough inspection.

The conclusion was a sad one: "The block is shot." In just one phrase, expectations for the 100th Pikes Peak International Hill Climb went from poor to zero. The car will still be on display in the Toyo Tires booth, but it won't be going up the hill, at least not until next year. Let's just hope Ken's next viral video will include some shots of the Hoonipigasus as well.





 
 
 
 
 

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