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3,400-Mile 1986 Suzuki GSX-R1100 Breathes With Ease Thanks to K&N Air Filters

If manning a retro GSX-R through tight corners doesn’t put a smile on your face, we honestly don’t know what will.
1986 Suzuki GSX-R1100 14 photos
1986 Suzuki GSX-R11001986 Suzuki GSX-R11001986 Suzuki GSX-R11001986 Suzuki GSX-R11001986 Suzuki GSX-R11001986 Suzuki GSX-R11001986 Suzuki GSX-R11001986 Suzuki GSX-R11001986 Suzuki GSX-R11001986 Suzuki GSX-R11001986 Suzuki GSX-R11001986 Suzuki GSX-R11001986 Suzuki GSX-R1100
The bike you’re looking at here is a 1986 variant of Suzuki’s esteemed GSX-R1100 lineup, sporting a modern battery, refurbished carbs and a fresh set of K&N inhalers. Additionally, the Gixxer’ five-digit analog odometer tells us that it’s been ridden for a mere 3,400 miles (5,500 km) during its lifetime.

Below the iconic bodywork, this ruthless piece of Japanese machinery hides a twin-cooled 1,052cc inline-four leviathan, with dual overhead camshafts, four Mikuni carburetors, and sixteen valves. The four-stroke titan is perfectly capable of spawning up to 128 wicked ponies at 9,500 rpm, along with 76 pound-feet (103 Nm) of feral twisting force at 8,000 spins.

This ungodly oomph is fed to a chain final drive by means of a five-speed gearbox, enabling the GSX-R1100 to sprint past the quarter-mile mark in just 10.7 ticks. Furthermore, Suzuki’s predator prides itself with a blistering top speed of 155 mph (250 kph), while its dry weight is rated at just 433 pounds (196 kg).

The entire structure sits on 41 mm (1.6 inches) telescopic forks at the front and a full-floater monoshock at the rear end. Plentiful stopping power is generated by dual 310 mm (12.2 inches) rotors and four-piston calipers up north, along with a single 220 mm (8.7 inches) brake disc and a two-piston caliper down south. The ‘86 MY juggernaut crawls on aluminum hoops with three pairs of twin spokes, flexing a diameter of 18 inches on both ends.

Should you be looking to get a taste of the old-school Gixxer experience, you’ll be thrilled to learn that the specimen featured above could be yours! If this state of affairs gets you excited, you ought to visit the IMA (Iconic Motorbike Auctions) website before October 22, when the bidding deadline will be reached. At this time, the top bid is placed at 6,100 bucks, but the reserve still hasn’t been met.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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