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1978 Pontiac Trans Am Sitting in a Barn Hides Good News Under the Hood, No Rust

The 1978 Firebird didn’t necessarily bring major styling refinements as compared to the previous model, and in many ways, the most notable change was the upgrade received by the famous W72 engine.
1978 Trans Am 21 photos
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Available on the Trans Am and the Formula, the engine was upgraded from 200 to 220 horsepower, specifically to provide drivers with more adrenaline behind the wheel.

1978 was, however, the last year when the W72 was produced, with Pontiac actually planning to save about 10,000 units specifically to use them on the 1979 Firebird. Thanks to the demand for the W72, however, Pontiac managed to save just around 8,600 engines that made their way to the ’79 Firebird.

Regarding the production numbers, the Trans Am was the most popular version, accounting for more than 93,000 units out of the total 187,000 Firebirds produced this year.

One of them is right here, coming out from a barn where it’s been sitting for a long time. As you can tell from the photos shared online by eBay seller banditsclassicunits, the car doesn’t necessarily come in its best shape, but on the other hand, it’s not a wreck either.

In fact, the seller says there’s no worrying rust on this Trans Am, and the best news is hiding under the hood. The original 400 paired with an automatic transmission still turns over by hand, so it’s not locked up from sitting.

Despite these claims, however, the floors and the trunk pans still require some patching, but a thorough inspection is recommended anyway to figure out just to how degree the metal has already been compromised.

Based on the shared photos, this Trans Am is definitely worth a full restoration, especially if the price is right. At this point, the only bid is around $7,800, and given a reserve hasn’t been enabled, this could be the winning offer.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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