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This 1956 Spartan Royal Manor Is a Fully Modernized Trailer With Luxury Appointments

As the recreational trailer industry took off after World War II, wealthy industrialist J. Paul Getty abandoned aircraft manufacturing to build motorhomes. Spartan Aircraft became the Spartan Trailer Company, and from Getty's factory in Tulsa, Oklahoma, rolled out the Royal Mansion in 1948.
1956 Spartan Royal Manor trailer restomod 18 photos
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One of the most luxurious motorhomes back in the day, the Royal Mansion was both massive and expensive. It cost as much as a small house, but the top-notch construction and the luxurious features soon earned Spartan a reputation as one of the industry's leading companies.

As Spartan was struggling to keep up with demand, the Royal Mansion also went into the history books as the Cadillac of the trailer market. Come 2021, and these motorhomes are hard to find. And when they do pop up for sale, they usually cost more than a luxury car.

This fully restored and modernized example from 1956 is being auctioned off by eBay seller "colinatx" as we speak and even though bidding is at $99,000 with three days to go, the listing still has a "reserve not met" status.

So what makes this trailer so expensive, you ask? Well, it's been fully renovated and modernized by Wheelhouse Mobile of Lockhard, Texas. The shell and the chassis were restored and weatherproofed, and the 32-foot-long trailer looks flawless from every angle.

The interior is even more spectacular, but you should know that the owner went with a full redesign and ditched everything but the bathroom vanity mirror in the process. Yes, this Royal Manor is no longer original on the inside, but it's a stunning place to spend time in, and it comes with all the amenities you can find in a modern motorhome.

The kitchen features solid Texas Pecan countertops and shelves, a two-burner propane stove, Krause stainless sink, and a retro-looking fridge in light green. The bathroom is just as modern, thanks to a composting toilet and dual 12V exhaust vent fans, a stainless-steel topper with a storage drawer, a stainless-steel shower box, and a sliding pocket door.

The electrical system is also brand-new and was designed for use with an external 110V or 220V power supply. All light switches are of the push-pull variety with mother of pearl inlays and have dimmer functions in almost all locations.

The owner also installed a heavy-duty cable designed to connect to solar panels on the roof if someone decides to fit the trailer with a renewable energy system. Likewise, the plumbing system is designed to run with a pressurized city water supply via a garden hose or via 60 gallons of onboard water tank storage and pump.

As far as sleeping arrangements go, the trailer has a queen bed in the rear and a table that converts to a bed in the front. In short, it can sleep four people comfortably, but it's probably better off as a luxury mobile home for two. A hydraulic system lifts the bed to reveal three storage compartments. Both ends have large windows that allow plenty of natural light into the camper.

All told, this 1956 Spartan Royal Manor is a fine example of trailer restomodding done right. Granted, it's far from affordable, but you won't find another one like it out there. And this camper is worth a look, even if you're not into trailers. Because it's almost a work of art.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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