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Texas Junkyard Is Home to a Couple of Extremely Rare Airstream Trailers

Junkyards are mostly popular for their massive supplies of classic car parts, but sometimes they also hide rare automobiles. They're usually damaged beyond repair, but, from time to time, you can stumble upon a hard-to-find gem that's a solid restoration project and deserves to be saved.
abandoned Airstream Wee Wind trailers 6 photos
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Most of the time they're automobiles, but junkyards can also hide rare trucks, busses, and even RVs. Finding a rare camper in such a place is a bit unlikely, but YouTube's "Classic Car Rescue" just discovered a pair of vintage Airstream trailers in a Texas junkyard.

But these aren't just any run-of-the-mill Airstreams. Both of them are Wee Wind 16-foot trailers, which were manufactured only in 1948 and 1949. Most sources agree that Airstream made only 60 of them, and only a dozen are known to still exist. So the fact that this junkyard includes not one but two Wee Winds is huge!

Not only that, but the trailers appear to be in solid conditions as far as looks go, with no visible damage to their all-aluminum bodywork. On the other hand, the guy who filmed them wasn't able to get close enough to fully assess their condition.

So are these trailers are sale? Do we know their exact location? Sadly, the answer to the second question is no. The finder didn't disclose the exact location of this junkyard and the only bit of info we get is that it's somewhere in Texas. As a result, we can't answer the first question, though we bet many of you trailer nuts out there would be interested to know.

Airstream started making trailers in the 1930s with the tiny Torpedo. As it began making increasingly large trailers, it rolled out the 22-foot Liner in 1947. One year later, the Wee Wind arrived as a 16-foot version of Liner.

Also, a streamlined trailer with an all-aluminum, polished body, the Wee Wind debuted the "door within a door concept," which included a screen door behind the aluminum door so travelers could enjoy the breeze without letting bugs in.

With only a dozed out of 60 produced still around, the Wee Wind is one of the rarest and most desirable Airstream trailers out there. They rarely pop up for sale, and when they do, they usually cost a lot of money. Even when the said RV is just a project in need of a thorough restoration.

The trailers are shown at the 0:30-minute mark, and the video clearly indicates that the junkyard is located near a road. The second half of the footage reveals that the owner has more vehicles in a different place, but we still don't get clues as to where the abandoned part of the hoard is.

Does anyone know where this junkyard is? If so, let me know in the comments.

Update: It has come to our attention that at least one of the trailers shown in this video is a 1960s Bambi and not a late 1940s Wee Wind. Hat tip goes to Autoevolution reader "Airstream Club Historian."

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