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Rejuvenated 1972 Honda CB350F Looks the Business, Framework Needs Some Love

It wouldn’t make you the fastest person at any riders’ gatherings and that’s fine, because you’d certainly be one of the classiest.
1972 Honda CB350F 27 photos
1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F1972 Honda CB350F
Despite the fact that it'd seen north of 32k miles (51,500 km), the sprightly 1972 Honda CB350F displayed in these photos still looks as clean as a whistle, and it’s all thanks to an extensive restoration carried out in multiple stages. Under previous ownership, a four-into-two aftermarket exhaust system made its appearance to replace the standard four-into-four plumbing.

Unless this was done due to irreparable corrosion, we really don’t know why someone would swap the gorgeous OEM pipes of a CB350 with anything else, but to each their own. Following the latest owner’s acquisition in 2021, Honda’s beauty received a new gas tank to keep its appearance nice and clean, while the fuel petcock, front brake and carbs have all been refurbished.

Moreover, both wheels were fitted with fresh spokes, and the front rim was discarded to make room for a youthful replacement. The bike’s engine saw its cylinder heads decked, timing chain adjusted and valve clearances optimized. What powers the ‘72 MY CB350F is an air-cooled 347cc inline-four with quad Keihin inhalers and eight valves actuated by a single overhead cam.

By delivering up to 34 horses and 18 pound-feet (24 Nm) of torque, the four-banger grants its bearer the ability to hit a top speed of 98 mph (158 kph). A steel semi-double cradle frame holds everything where it belongs, sitting on telescopic forks up north and twin preload-adjustable shocks down south. Front-end stopping power comes from a solo brake disc, and the rear wheel is brought to a halt by a traditional drum.

Without taking any fluids into consideration, this downsized UJM weighs a mere 353 pounds (160 kg). The restored exemplar we’ve just looked at is going under the hammer right now, but you’ve only got until tomorrow (June 28) to place your bids on Bring a Trailer. As of now, 2,500 bucks are all you’d need to take this creature home.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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