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McLaren 720S Shooting Brake Rendered as the British Grand Tourer We Need

There's no point in concealing the fact that we adore day-dreaming. In our office, this means seeking the spiciest renderings across the world wide web and bringing them to you. And while some of these pixel stunts are pure fantasy, others bring us dreams that would be brilliant if they came true. Case in point with the McLaren 720S Shooting Brake.
McLaren 720S Shooting Brake Render 10 photos
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The 720S-based render we have here comes from digital art label Rain Prisk, which haves a fetish for applying to S/B treatment to just about any cool machine out there.

Nevertheless, as we mentioned above, if Woking decided to place its badge on such a contraption, we'd end up with a brilliant machine.

You know, a car that would give the Ferrari GTC4Lusso, a machine that pretty much plays in a class of its own, a run for its money. And since the Brits use a more rational approach than the Italians, we're could expect the result to be even more practical than a Bentley Continental GT, which can be considered the closest rival of the said Prancing Horse.

Heck, if gifted with a decent ground clearance, such a car could also act as a crossover alternative. After all, Woking won't tap into the SUV market too soon, simply because its work-in-progress identity means such a move could easily confuse its customer base.

Of course, McLaren doesn't currently have a platform that could support such a continent blitzer, since its carbon tubs feature a mid-engined layout.

But if the carmaker came up with such a development, the resulting vehicle would also steal some potential Lamborghini customers. For one thing, aficionados have been expecting the Raging Bull to bring back its front-engined Grand Tourer DNA for years, but it seems such a move isn't set to take place too soon.

 
 
 
 
 

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