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Don’t Be Fooled by the Look of This 1966 Mustang Fastback, It Needs Everything

There are plenty of Mustang projects out there, but on the other hand, finding one that’s worth the time and money isn’t as easy as it sounds.
1966 Ford Mustang 24 photos
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This 1966 C-code fastback, for example, might look pretty solid at first glance, but on the other hand, it’s actually a very challenging project.

In other words, you shouldn’t be fooled by the look of the car because this Mustang is nothing more than a project car requiring total restoration. eBay seller mustangdoctorofvegas says the Mustang has just been tweaked to look presentable “so the neighbors don’t complain.

The owner admits the car needs everything, including major metalwork, so it’s pretty clear whoever ends up buying this Mustang would have a very challenging job to bring it back to the road.

Since it’s a C-code Mustang, the car was born with a 289 (4.7-liter) V8 engine under the hood with a 2-barrel carburetor. For this model year, this particular engine developed 200 horsepower.

However, in charge of putting the wheels in motion right now is a 302 (4.9-liter) V8 engine, possibly received from a 1968 Mustang – this was the year when Ford officially introduced a 302 engine on the Mustang with J code.

If there’s something that’s really good news on this 1966 Mustang, it is the interior. The seller explains everything is still there, so in theory, the restoration process should be much easier inside.

All in all, this Mustang looks restorable, but this doesn’t necessarily mean that saving it would be easy. And given the original engine is no longer in the car, the only way to go is a restomod anyway, so the asking price is optimistic, to say the least.

The owner expects to get $18,400 for the car, though, at the same time, they enabled the Make Offer button, just in case someone is interested in another deal.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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