autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 
Custom Triumph Bonneville JBBS Is Somewhere Between Bobber, Scrambler and Cafe Racer
You’ll have a pretty hard time trying to classify this machine, as it employs styling elements from multiple genres.

Custom Triumph Bonneville JBBS Is Somewhere Between Bobber, Scrambler and Cafe Racer

Triumph Bonneville JBBSTriumph Bonneville JBBSTriumph Bonneville JBBSTriumph Bonneville JBBSTriumph Bonneville JBBSTriumph Bonneville JBBSTriumph Bonneville JBBSTriumph Bonneville JBBSTriumph Bonneville JBBSTriumph Bonneville JBBSTriumph Bonneville JBBSTriumph Bonneville JBBSTriumph Bonneville JBBS
When it comes down to modified Triumphs, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a workshop whose know-how can equal that of Tamarit Motorcycles. It’s easy to forget this firm has only been around since 2015 because its portfolio is home to more than 100 custom projects, and there are no two alike.

Under the leadership of Quique and Matías, Tamarit doesn’t seem to plan on hitting the brakes anytime soon! Instead, the pace at which they build has only been getting faster and more efficient over the years, but that’s not to say any shortcuts are ever being taken on their bike-modding ventures.

Aside from the bespoke commissions we love to drool over, the Spanish outfit also deals with the fabrication of bolt-on parts like those originally used on their bikes. Tamarit’s website is home to a massive selection of aftermarket goodies for Triumph owners to choose from, including saddles, exhaust systems, and just about everything in between.

The menacing Bonneville T100 featured in these photos is a bit of an oddball, merging a caffeinated silhouette with bobber cues and scrambler-esque pipework. It doesn’t exactly fall into any particular category, however, and that’s an excellent example of how this workshop thinks outside the box to keep things fresh.

Nicknamed JBBS, this bad boy is the 104th project to emerge from their Elche-based customization clinic, with its base being a 2008 variant of Triumph’s family. Given the motorcycle’s slammed and mostly murdered-out demeanor, we’d imagine it’s a stark contrast to the sunny streets of Mallorca, which is where Tamarit’s client resides.

To the team’s delight, the customer decided to keep the design brief completely open and give them the freedom to craft whatever they pleased. A full teardown was promptly executed once the donor arrived at their shop, then it came time to revise its running gear.

In terms of suspension mods, the front end got fitted with a retro-style springer module that was initially devised for a Harley. At six o’clock, one may spot a mildly stretched swingarm mated to high-grade Nitro shock absorbers from Hagon’s catalog. The Bonnie’s OEM hoops were deleted in favor of 16-inch aftermarket units whose rims are hugged by Dunlop Roadmaster tires.

To add a bit more visual mass down south, Tamarit installed a pair of riveted wheel covers they’ve manufactured in-house. Rear-end proportions are kept nice and tight thanks to a shortened subframe, on top of which we find a solo saddle wrapped in marine-grade vinyl.

You’ll see a simple tailor-made plate encasing the underside of the looped subframe, and it houses built-in LED taillights near the tip. The stock fuel chamber is still in play, but it’s been reworked with a new filler cap, chromed tank badges, and a metal strap running from front to back.

At its northernmost point, it bears digital Motogadget instrumentation and a neat strip of warning lights underneath. Glancing further up at the Bonneville’s cockpit, we notice a flat handlebar equipped with Biltwell grips, fresh control levers, and tidy switchgear, as well as bar-end blinkers and mirrors.

There’s an adaptive LED headlamp rounding things out up front, and an auxiliary module provides additional lighting when needed. After they’d serviced the engine, Tamarit’s moto architects proceeded to fit a high-mounted Zard exhaust, along with unrestrictive air filters at the intake side of things.

For the finishing touches, JBBS was garnished with a bolt-on chain guard, belly pan, and license plate bracket, all of which originate from the workshop’s very own inventory. Lastly, the chosen color scheme is monochromatic and understated, yet gorgeously elegant in its simplicity, consisting of black, white and grey surfaces.

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories