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Century-Old Train Car-Limo Hybrid Becomes a Quirky Tiny Home

We’ve seen a lot of unusual tiny homes over time, from skoolies to shipping containers, but this quirky red house beats them all. It’s not only been around for a hundred years, but it’s an unexpected hybrid between a railroad caboose and a limo bus.
This red caboose from 1912 was an ice cream shop, an office for a limo company, and now a tiny home 15 photos
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For those who aren’t familiar with the term, a caboose is the last railroad car connected to a freight train in North America used by the crew. It mostly served as the conductor’s office. This particular red caboose was built back in 1912 and refurbished in 2009 when it was fitted with a modified interior from a decommissioned limo bus.

The unusual hybrid served as an ice cream shop throughout the years before becoming an office and showroom for a limo company. Folks living in the Campbellville area in Halton, Canada, have considered it part of the local heritage since it’s been there for decades.

The colorful caboose made headlines last year as one of the cheapest listings in the Greater Toronto Area, where residential properties usually cost hundreds of thousands of dollars, even up to a million.

Now, the caboose will start a new chapter in its long life as the home of a retiree. CTV News reported that a 64-year-old paid CAD $45,000 ($34.848) for this former train car that still needs serious upgrades to become a real tiny home.

There’s no kitchen or running water, but it’s wired for electricity. A couple of leather benches, LED lights, a bar fridge, and a built-in stereo are pretty much all that the caboose has to offer. But the new owner is already working on renovating it and turning it into a welcoming home.

Even with these investments, and the fact that she also has to pay a monthly rent to the owner of the lot, the retiree believes that the costs are much lower than if she had purchased a conventional house in the area.

Who knew that even a former train car from 1912 could become a cozy tiny home? It looks like this red caboose will have a very long, happy life.

 
 
 
 
 

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