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1973 Plymouth Barracuda Sleeping Inside Under a Tarp Begs for Total Restoration

1972 brought a small production increase for the Barracuda, as Plymouth ended up building close to 18,500 units, up from about 16,500 cars a year before.
1973 Barracuda 23 photos
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The Barracuda itself accounted for the lion’s share with over 10,000 vehicles, and more than 6,350 rolled off the assembly lines with a 340 (5.5-liter) engine under the hood.

1973 witnessed another increase, this time by approximately 800 cars, with the ‘Cuda accounting for nearly half of the production. The most common choice was the 340 ‘Cuda with nearly 6,600 cars.

The Barracuda someone has recently published on eBay is actually one of the least popular configurations for this model year. It was fitted with a 318 (5.2-liter) V8, and according to seller ta_52615, the same engine is still there in charge of putting the car in motion.

However, it’s not clear if the powerplant is running or not, but given the car looks like it’s been sitting for a very long time, don’t be too surprised if it doesn’t.

Worth knowing, however, is that the long-term storage part happened inside, with the car sleeping under a tarp. In other words, the Barracuda has easily passed the test of time, and the rust you can see in the photos is only on the surface of the metal.

The interior is also in a good shape, and the owner guarantees that what this car needs is a good wash. The parts that appear to be missing are also available, they say, so in theory, this Barracuda is a complete project waiting for a full restoration if someone is willing to give it a second chance.

Unsurprisingly, the car is unlikely to sell for cheap, with the bidding already exceeding $9,000. On the other hand, you should know that no reserve has been enabled, so whoever sends the top bid can then take the car home and decide its fate.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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