autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 

1965 Chevrolet Impala Owned by a Military Family Hides Something Original Under the Hood

Historically speaking, the 1965 Impala is one of the most important models in the automotive world, as it was the first car in the U.S. after World War II to sell more than 1 million units in a single year.
1965 Chevrolet Impala 24 photos
1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala1965 Chevrolet Impala
This says a lot about the popularity of the Chevrolet Impala in the ‘60s, especially as, in theory, it was still a rather new nameplate. The Impala was launched in 1958 as the top Bel Air version, and it was promoted to a dedicated series only a year later.

All of these make the 1965 Impala a very sought-after collectible, with all-original, unmolested, and unrestored models in tip-top shape selling for more than $100k.

This ’65 Impala doesn’t check all of these rare boxes, but on the other hand, it does seem to meet the main requirements for a full restoration process.

First of all, it was originally owned by a military family stationed at Fort Benning in Columbus, Georgia, and it somehow remained an all-original gem during all these years. Its condition isn’t necessarily the best, with the trunk and the floors obviously failing victims to the invasion of the rust.

The interior also needs a full refresh, and there’s a chance the engine would also have to be rebuilt.

But when it comes to the engine, it’s one of the main selling points of the car. The Impala is fitted with the more powerful version of the 327 (5.3-liter) small-block – the 1965 MY was offered with either 250 or a 300-horsepower 327. The original unit is therefore still there, so if you’re planning a full restoration to factory specifications, this Impala could be up for the job.

The bidding for the car is currently underway, and given it’s sold without a reserve, there’s a good chance it’ll find a new home when the auction started by seller 2015usdauni comes to an end. The top offer, however, barely exceeds $1,000 right now.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories