autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 
Modern Classic: This 1958 Chevrolet Impala Is a Perfect 10, Priced Accordingly
The Impala nameplate first got to see the daylight in 1956 when Chevrolet presented a sports coupe at the General Motors Motorama. It was obviously just a concept, but the company eventually needed just two years to make it reality.

Modern Classic: This 1958 Chevrolet Impala Is a Perfect 10, Priced Accordingly

1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala1958 Chevrolet Impala
So in 1958, the Impala made its way to the market as the top-of-the-line version. It was available only as a convertible and a sports coupe, but even so, it rapidly became a hit. In fact, Impala’s ascension was so fast that even Chevy itself was caught unprepared, so the GM brand had no other option than to turn it into a stand-alone series only a year later.

And the sales increase just kept on going and going. The Impala eventually became the first car in the U.S. (after WWII) to sell more than one million units in a single year in 1965, with the sales remaining at record levels during the rest of the decade as well.

Between 1958 and 1996, the Impala production totaled over 13 million cars, and this says a lot about how popular this nameplate ended up becoming.

As a result, the 1958 Impala has a special place in the heart and the garage of many collectors out there. It’s the model that started it all, so spending a small fortune on an example in mint condition just makes sense.

The folks over at Ideal Classic Cars are selling such a 1958 Impala, though in their case, the classic has already been mixed with the modern. So what we have here is a restomod, obviously in tip-top shape, sporting a unique combination of old and new.

It makes little sense to discuss the quality of the paint and the condition of the metal because the photos are obviously really worth a thousand words this time. Everything is a perfect 10, both inside and outside.

The cabin features a retro mix of red, silver, and black, while the trunk comes with the correct red oxide finish that was used on the original Impala.

In addition to the highly desirable Continental Kit, this Impala also sports wide white wall tires, a K&N air cleaner, finned valve covers, and new rocker panel moldings.

Now let’s talk engines.

The 1958 Impala could be ordered with a 235 (3.8-liter) six-cylinder unit, while in terms of V8s, the car was available with either 283 (4.7-liter) muscle or with the more powerful 348 (5.7-liter) unit rated at 280 horsepower. The most expensive version was the Ram-Jet fuel-injected 348, which added $488 to the price tag.

This Impala no longer has the original engine, so it’s now powered by a 350 (5.7-liter) V8 engine with a 4-barrel carburetor and paired with a Turbo Hydramatic 350 Transmission. No further information has been offered on the engine, but it goes without saying that it’s running properly given the overall condition of the car.

What would be more interesting to know is what car actually donated the engine, especially as such information could eventually add more value to the restomod. Given the mileage is also unknown, you should just reach out to the garage currently selling the car to receive additional information in this regard.

At the end of the day, this Impala is without a doubt worth the money, but on the other hand, it’ll be interesting to see if collectors out there are willing to pay $85,000 on a car that has already lost its original coolness.

Most likely, it’s only just a matter of time until someone buys the car anyway, especially because the 1958 Impala continues to be a very desirable classic these days.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories