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1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod Has the Weirdest Color Combination

Custom builds are meant to be unique, and depending on who’s working on them, that can mean a number of things. A great choice of colors and a smart combination of hues is often the easiest path toward a worth-remembering project.
1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod 29 photos
1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod1935 Dodge Pickup Street Rod
The 1935 Dodge pickup street rod we have in the gallery above is unique because of the way it was built, and weird because of the color combination which could give fashionistas headaches.

Styled like the rat rods of old, with exposed wheels, a long front section that continues with the cab and ends with the rather short bed, and with the engine uncovered by any piece of metal, the Dodge is a sight to behold.

The color chosen for the body, or at least most of it, is matte grey. Over it, starting from where the hood of normal cars ends, are red metallic flames shooting back with a lime green outline, the same lime green that in a weird attempt at symmetry can be found on the wheels as well.

The interior is equally as bizarre, with the bucket seats sporting an industrial look, and aluminum cladding on several elements that looks like tinfoil that was forgotten there from a time when the build was still in the shop.

If you find the strength to get passed the strange color combination, some clever engineering will unravel. The Dodge rides low to the ground, thanks to the fact the body has been channeled over the frame, and the rear suspension system runs through the bed.

At the front, behind the 1935 Dodge grille, sits in full view a 350ci (5.7-liter) V8 linked, obviously, to a manual transmission with five speeds. We are not being told anything about the performance numbers of the engine.

Weird as it is, the pickup is likely to speak volumes to some people, and they’re in luck as it is for sale. The asking price is a little under $29,000.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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