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Trail Neo 1 Hardtail e-MTB Brings Peak Bosch Components and Likes to Play Dirty
The cycling industry is changing. Riders typically depend on nothing more than their body composition to win a race or have fun on a trail, but now, we have motors and batteries built into mountain-crushing machines.

Trail Neo 1 Hardtail e-MTB Brings Peak Bosch Components and Likes to Play Dirty

Trail Neo 1 Hardtail e-MTBTrail Neo 1 Hardtail e-MTBTrail Neo Rear Triangle DesignTrail Neo Hardtail FrameTrail Neo Hardtail Motor HousingTrail Neo Hardtail FrameTrail Neo Hardtail Battery MountTrail Neo Hardtail Design
The bike before you is known as the Trail Neo 1 from none other than Cannondale, and yes, it's one of those MTBs that features a motor and battery to help you explore trails and the great outdoors further than your own body would usually take you.

If you don't know who Cannondale is, not a problem. To get an idea of the kind of manufacturer you're up against, you can consider Cannondale as a sort of Airstream or Winnebago of the cycling industry. Since 1971, this team has focused on imagination, creativity and not conforming to any rulebook. Fifty years later, their machines run alongside major cycling players like Trek, Bianchi, Giant, and any other podium-placing brand.

As for the red rider you see in the cover photo, Cannondale promises a solid hardtail e-MTB equipped with some of the most capable electronics out there. Speaking of electronics, we might as well get into the thick of it all by announcing that Bosch will be Neo's electronic component supplier. With that said, Neo is equipped with a Performance Line CX motor, a trinket with a whopping 85 Nm (63 lb-ft) of torque, that should be more than enough to get you flying through the woods.

Powering the motor is a 625 Wh battery. Cannondale's website shows that you can attain a 124 km (77 mi) range with this setup. Well, that can't be right, can it? After doing a bit of digging on Bosch's product page, that proves to be correct. Under the optimum conditions, you can ride for 77 miles. Pretty dang sweet if you're looking to be outdoors for as long as possible. Heck, with a bit of proper working of your motor's assistance and you could very well ride a tad further than that.

As for the actual bike itself, the Trail Neo presents the sort of geometry typical of a hardtail trail crusher. Riders may also enjoy how the top tube blends into one smooth line with the seat stay, creating a nice dropped top tube that offers clearance as you ride. Overall, Cannondale uses a SmartForm C1 Alloy frame with internal cable routing to keep everything clean and snag-free. Integrated into the downtube is the battery, but the beauty is that if you buy yourself another pack and when the first is drained, you can toss on a recharged battery and double that already insane range.

For suspension, hardtails rely on the presence of a front fork to take the brunt off of blows, and Neo 1 features a RockShox 35 Gold RL with 100 mm (3.93 in) of travel and a sweet 51 mm (2 in) offset to offer a stable trail to your stance. Tires, too, play a vital role for suspension, and a set of Maxxis Rekon running 27.5 in or 29 in tires should do just fine.

For everything else, there's Shimano. Shimano brings front and rear hubs, MT400 hydraulic disc brakes with 180 mm (7.08 in) rotors, and a 12-speed drivetrain setup. Here, you'll find a Deore chain, SLX 11-51T rear cassette, SLX derailleur, and Deore M6100 shifters. Top off the rest of the bike with a proprietary handlebar, saddle, seat post, and stem, and the Trail Neo 1 is complete. Happy riding to you.

How much can you expect to pay for this puppy? It all depends on the dealership you go through to acquire one, but prices are set around 5,500 USD (4,746 EUR at current exchange rates) and up range so do bring your checkbook.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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