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Project Glory Proposes a Sailing Expedition Yacht With Tilting Masts and Luxe Amenities
Concepts are an industry’s dreams, either for a possible tomorrow or an alternative future. When it comes to superyacht explorers, their dreams are bright, luxurious, and with hybrid propulsion.

Project Glory Proposes a Sailing Expedition Yacht With Tilting Masts and Luxe Amenities

Project Glory is a sail-assisted superyacht explorer with tilting masts and solid sailsProject Glory is a sail-assisted superyacht explorer with tilting masts and solid sailsProject Glory is a sail-assisted superyacht explorer with tilting masts and solid sailsProject Glory is a sail-assisted superyacht explorer with tilting masts and solid sailsProject Glory is a sail-assisted superyacht explorer with tilting masts and solid sailsProject Glory is a sail-assisted superyacht explorer with tilting masts and solid sailsProject Glory is a sail-assisted superyacht explorer with tilting masts and solid sailsProject Glory is a sail-assisted superyacht explorer with tilting masts and solid sailsProject Glory is a sail-assisted superyacht explorer with tilting masts and solid sailsProject Glory is a sail-assisted superyacht explorer with tilting masts and solid sails
This is Glory, a diesel-electric superyacht explorer like nothing we see today, whether in use or at shipyards, under construction. Project Glory is the latest concept from naval and automotive designer Steve Kozloff, a sailing expedition yacht with tilting masts and luxurious amenities, an ice-class hull and a garage packed with toys and gear.

Glory is the dream superyacht explorer any billionaire would be proud to call his own.

As it so happens, Glory also exists only on paper, for the time being. Kozloff is a known designer but, as of the time of press, not one of his superyacht concepts has any progress in terms of becoming real. His most famous body of work is the Goliath series of concepts, which is also where Glory fits in.

A while back, Kozloff introduced a new type of sailing superyacht, one that featured a system of masts and sails inspired by the Chantiers de l’Atlantique Solid Sail and AeolDrive sail and mast system. The same rig is now being used for Glory, which would effectively extend its rage and maneuverability, while decreasing costs and maintenance. After showcasing it on Caribù 2 and Elegante with double and single masts, respectively, Kozloff is using it on Glory, this time with triple masts.

The three masts and the solid sails tilt 70 degrees forward, reducing air draft from 244 feet to 153 feet (74.3 to 46.6 meters), and allowing Glory to pass bridges other sailing rigs wouldn’t be able to clear. All three masts are free-standing, so they can rotate and allow the captain to point the ship in whichever direction he needs, without taking into account wind direction. At the same time, the 30,000 square-foot (2,787 square-meter) solid sails have a longer lifecycle than typical Dacron sails and are easier to maintain and operate. Being made of semi-rigid panels hinged together, they can fold up and down at the touch of a button.

Glory is a 561-foot (171-meter), five-deck superyacht with ice-class capabilities, which makes it an explorer. It was designed for long-range sailing in even the most difficult conditions, whether we’re talking about freezing temperatures or rough waters, while not compromising in luxury or capacity to haul all the necessary gear for exploring adventures of all types.

Kozloff imagines Glory with a “cavernous” full-beam garage where the owner could easily fit in at least a couple of Nemo U-Boat Worx submarines, including the launching and retrieval systems, four tenders, inflatables, life boats, and a variety of toys. There’s also a helipad with a gyro-stabilized platform and a hangar, to store the aircraft when it’s no longer needed and protect it from the elements. The hangar alone is big enough to accommodate two such aircraft or three smaller eVTOLs – the designer is thinking ahead, of the times when these so-called “flying cars” become standard aircraft for personal use.

Amenities include a sizable pool on the upper deck and a jacuzzi, a grand piano bar decked in the finest Italian marble and with floor-to-ceiling glazing for spectacular panoramic views, two master suites and one owner’s suite, a couple more sit-down bars on the upper decks, formal and informal entertaining spaces, and full beach club with retractable decks. One assumes it would also have a gym, wellness center and media room, which are standard fare on today’s superyachts. Glory would sleep 26 guests and a crew of 40.

Powered by three Cummins engines and two fixed electric motors developing a total of 6,000 hp at 1,600 RPM, Glory would travel at top speeds of 17 knots (19.5 mph / 31.5 kph) on diesel only and 12 knots (13.8 mph / 22.2 kph) on sails. At a cruising speed of 14 knots (16 mph / 26 kph), range is estimated at 6,700 nautical miles (7,710 miles / 12,408 km) or 12 days of non-stop sailing.

Now all Glory needs is someone with deep enough pockets to pay to have it built.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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