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Porsche 912 Gets First Clean in 18 Years, Dry Ice Is Involved

Some abandoned cars are worth more than others, and classic Porsche models tend to be valuable. If they have a story behind them, there's a good chance that the value goes even higher. Before that happens, they need to be restored. Here is one such example of a vehicle that got a dry ice cleaning. Its first clean in 18 years, to be precise.
Porsche 912 gets first clean in 18 years with dry ice machine 7 photos
Photo: Screenshot from YouTube video by AMMO NYC
Porsche 912 gets first clean in 18 years with dry ice machinePorsche 912 gets first clean in 18 years with dry ice machinePorsche 912 gets first clean in 18 years with dry ice machinePorsche 912 gets first clean in 18 years with dry ice machinePorsche 912 gets first clean in 18 years with dry ice machineDry ice machine on painted fender
Instead of the usual wash that covers the vehicle inside and out, this example of a Porsche 912 is getting cleaned with dry ice, but only for its undercarriage and wheel wells. While the engine and transmission will be taken down to be rebuilt, the wheel wells need to be cleared of the factory-applied undercoating, as well as the grime that adds up in decades of use.

In the case of this example, the 911 gets attention from Larry Kosilla of AMMO NYC after it spent over 18 years outside a mechanic shop in Greenwich, CT. The vehicle is set to go through a restoration after assessing its status. However, cleaning it through traditional means would take days, and the end result would not be as nice as what you can see in the video that was embedded below.

As you can observe, the dry ice is perfect for clearing oil, gunk, and dirt from the mechanical components of the classic Porsche. In addition, as Larry explains, the dry ice machine can be adjusted on the fly to allow a more precise clearing of the dirt on the surface of the undercarriage without risking the removal of paint.

With the owner's permission, Larry went ahead and used the dry ice machine on a front fender, and it proved effective in removing paint in layers.

This is never to be done with paint that is not meant to be removed from a vehicle's body. If a full restoration is planned, it is interesting to see what happens when the machine is operated on painted surfaces that are cleaner than the undercarriage of a vehicle.

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About the author: Sebastian Toma
Sebastian Toma profile photo

Sebastian's love for cars began at a young age. Little did he know that a career would emerge from this passion (and that it would not, sadly, involve being a professional racecar driver). In over fourteen years, he got behind the wheel of several hundred vehicles and in the offices of the most important car publications in his homeland.
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