autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 

One-Off Indian FTR 1200 S Looks Like It’s Been Through Hell and It’s Proud of It

The name Church of Choppers needs no introduction in the custom motorcycle world. If you are not familiar with the shop by chance, then its latest creation, a custom Indian FTR 1200 S that looks like no other in its family, is the perfect introduction.
Custom Indian FTR 1200 S 39 photos
Indian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 SIndian FTR 1200 S
The two-wheeler, as you see it here, is the work of Church of Choppers’ Jeff Wright and a bunch of other dedicated men and women who like to take stock motorcycles apart and then remake them in unique ways. It was shown at The One Motorcycle Show that just concluded earlier this month in Portland, Oregon.

The idea of the bike was so radical that Indian itself proudly presented it as a former member of the FTR 1200 family. For us, the thing looks as it’s been through hell, or at least it took a couple of rides in the bad part of the city but came out alive and proudly wearing its scars. Only it didn’t, and it looks like this by design.

According to its maker, the transformation was based on the fact he will be riding the two-wheeler alone. The biggest changes were performed on the swingarm, which was remade to look like a stock one, only upside down. The bike was also fitted with two fully-adjustable Öhlins piggy-back shocks and Brembo calipers with red brake lines.

The naked machine looks even more exposed thanks to the few fiberglass body parts, new gas tank, and lower bars. A very in-your-face piece of hardware is the Racelift titanium Growler exhaust, and so is the new black leather seat with red stitching. Oh, and don’t even get us started on the twin Indian headlights fitted up front.

Visually, the bike was gifted with a neglected look thanks to the coating of the frame and swingarm in red and black, and special paintwork elsewhere signed by Wright’s partners for this project, Jeff and Dana Harrison.

No mention was made by the maker or Indian as to the cost of the build. As far as we understand, this bike is not for sale, at least not for now.

press release
 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories