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Nissan Electric Ice Cream Truck Looks Chilling

On June 20 the Brits celebrate Clean Air Day, the perfect moment for people and organization all across the island to doi their best to show they care. That includes Nissan, who on Thursday presented an ice-cream truck that is not powered by an ICE powerplant.
Nissan e-NV200 ice cream truck 26 photos
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Traditionally, ice cream trucks run on diesel, and most of the time the engine is kept on so that people buying the products are not left with a sticky goo on their hands. Obviously, keeping a diesel engine running is bad news for the environment.

Nissan says authorities in the UK are looking at ways to fine or even ban these happiness seeders because of this. So the Japanese came up with a solution: an electric ice cream truck based on the e-NV200 that looks just right for the job.

The conversion was made with the help and on behalf of Mackie’s of Scotland, a century-old ice cream maker. And it’s a working truck, complete with all the ingredients required to make ice cream.

To keep all the ingredients cooled at the right temperature, the van doesn’t use the 40 kWh battery needed to run the motor, but Nissan’s portable power pack called ROAM. Built from the battery cells of earlier electric vehicles, two of these power packs have enough juice (total capacity 1.4 kWh) to feed into the soft-serve machine, freezer drawer and drinks fridge.

Once they’re out of power, the packs can be recharged in about one hour using a 230V mains supply or in up to four hours using the van’s built-in solar panel roof.

To take the process of buying ice cream to the next level, the van was fitted with contactless bank card and smartphones readers.

Nissan did not say whether it plans to make this type of van a common sight on public roads.

press release
 
 
 
 
 

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