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Modified Cadillac CTS-V Engine Fails at 218 Mph

Vloggers from the AutoTopNL YouTube channel filmed an exceptional car in an exceptional situation on an exceptional road: a 1300-hp (1318 ps) Cadillac CTS-V at 349 kph (218 mph) on the Autobahn - Germany's no speed limit road. But here's proof that great power almost always comes with (possibly) great problems.
Modified Cadillac CTS-V Engine Fails at 218 Mph 6 photos
The engine of a modified Cadillac CTS-V breaks down at 218 mphThe engine of a modified Cadillac CTS-V breaks down at 218 mphThe engine of a modified Cadillac CTS-V breaks down at 218 mphThe engine of a modified Cadillac CTS-V breaks down at 218 mphThe engine of a modified Cadillac CTS-V breaks down at 218 mph
This car raised the speedometer needle to its upper 200 mph line and kept it stuck there, its acceleration continuing, but the speedometer unable to correctly estimate speed anymore. So it took a GPS-based speedometer to record the 349 kph (218 mph) that this Cadillac CTS-V managed to achieve on German highways.

Naturally, it's not a standard Cadillac. It's a modified one that's got two huge turbos on the V8 under the hood, thanks to which it delivers around 1,300 hp (1318 ps).

The car accelerated with intensity on the German motorways, it made an absolutely fabulous sound, but all the pleasure came quickly and at a price, in the form of an open hood and the Cadillac stopped on the side of the highway.

The owner, however, wasn't too bitter, knowing the car's quirks, and even said he was preparing it for even more power.

This experience shows that it's not the provision of high power that's the problem, but the balance between high power and engine resistance with that increased power. Watch this Cadillac's incredible 349 kph run on German motorways in the video below. You might want to turn on the sound.

AutoTop is a team of YouTubers that test exotic cars, hatchbacks, or powerful sedans. They say they are not interested in green and environmentally friendly cars (unless they are very fast). Their testers want to bring screaming exhausts, whining superchargers, and blowing turbos to the attention of enthusiasts. Acceleration tests with launch control are filmed with onboard cameras and published online.

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Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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