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Mazda RX-7 Shooting Brake Rendering Is Fast and Furiously Practical

Whenever we come across any Mazda RX-7 artwork, it takes us back in time to the early 90s. Even those who never got a chance to drive one probably still know the popular third-gen model from the original "The Need for Speed" video game, which came out in 1994. The RX-7 was one of multiple Class C cars within the game, together with the Acura NSX and the Toyota Supra Turbo.
Mazda RX-7 Shooting Brake rendering 11 photos
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Out in the real world, the third-generation RX-7 stood out as having the first-ever mass-produced sequential twin-turbocharger system exported from Japan. It was developed alongside Hitachi, helping to deliver a total of 252 hp (255 PS) in its initial stages. Later models had 276 hp (280 PS).

It may not sound like a lot today, but when we factor in how little it weighs—just picture driving a 252-hp rear-wheel-drive, low-to-the-ground Ford Fiesta—it needed just 5 seconds in order to hit 60 mph (96 kph).

Now, while its form factor is iconic, and we certainly can’t picture the RX-7 as anything other than a front/mid-engine RWD two-door sports car, we also can’t forget how the first-generation model technically had a hatchback-style rear end design. Therefore, there is a precedent regarding the RX-7 being both sporty and practical.

The second we saw this RX-7 Shooting Brake rendering by artist Khyzyl Saleem, we immediately thought about the nameplate’s first-gen roots. Of course, the render is a lot more complex, looking like something you might see on display at SEMA or some other similar event.

In order to nail the Shooting Brake aesthetic, the designer stretched the roof of the RX-7 past the rear wheel arches, making it nearly twice as long. Other novelties include the roof spoiler, trunk lid spoiler, a set of large aftermarket wheels, front splitter, side skirts, custom exhaust, lower ride height, and a roll cage fitted to the interior.

This is one custom RX-7 we definitely wouldn’t mind admiring in real life.



 
 
 
 
 

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