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Cupra Tavascan Hits the Nurburgring, Gets Spied, Drives Off in Silence

Cupra has begun testing the Tavascan, its first fully electric crossover, and the process also involved going to the Nürburgring. Fortunately for us, our spy photographers were there to catch it in action, and it looks like it was being driven hard.
2024 Cupra Tavascan prototype 26 photos
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The Cupra Tavascan has a clear link with the Volkswagen ID.4, which has offered its body, as well as its platform for grabs. The Spanish marque went ahead and modified the front end, while the rear was left unchanged.

As you can see in the photo gallery, the entire front of the vehicle is covered in camouflage, and even its headlights are concealed. Evidently, this is an early prototype, and the next testing sessions will reveal the vehicle with its production-spec headlights. It will also have a specific DRL signature, as well as turn signals, but do not expect anything too crazy.

After all, automakers have to stick with certain rules when they design their headlights, turn signals, and daytime running lights. Therefore, the Cupra Tavascan will not stray too far from the ID.4 regarding design, although there will be a few changes made to it.

For now, the development team is driving it hard on the 'Ring, and the driver is wearing a flameproof racing suit, racing gloves, and a helmet while feeding the Tavascan a portion of Spanish beans. In many cases, early prototypes of vehicles come with deactivated airbags or with just two functional airbags, which is why it does make sense to have a full racing attire.

It is worth noting, though, that the vehicle comes with OEM seats, and possibly with three-point seatbelts. The latter are tricky to see in the photo gallery, but they are there. If the vehicle also had racing seats, a set of harnesses, alongside a HANS device would have been optimal in the situation where the airbag is deactivated, and it is driven on the track.

 
 
 
 
 

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