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Crashed 2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E Looks Like an Insurance Write-Off

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety is currently testing the Mustang Mach-E, the Ford Motor Company’s first proper EV. Until the results are finally published, this totaled Mustang Mach-E gives us a clear picture of the crossover’s safety performance in the event of a crash.
Crashed 2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E insurance write-off 12 photos
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What’s the back story? According to the original poster, azfullsizebronco on Instagram, we’re looking at “a high-speed wreck. Lost control is what I was told. All [occupants] survived [and walked away with] minor injuries.”

Currently located in Phoenix, Arizona, at Sanderson Ford, the blue-painted sport utility vehicle is damaged pretty much everywhere. The front fascia, rear bumper and tailgate, both sides, and every single alloy wheel are beyond repair, along with the quarter panels, both mirrors, and windshield.

The A-pillars haven’t moved despite the impact’s tremendous forces, and the passenger cell is pretty much intact as well. Still, the interior is a mess because the front airbags and side curtain airbags have been deployed. Likely the first wrecked Mustang Mach-E in the United States, this sorry-looking electric crossover features AWD based on the front-door badges.

It’s impossible to figure out if we’re looking at the 68- or 88-kWh model, but it’s an insurance write-off that will likely end up on Copart. The least-expensive Mustang Mach-E with all-wheel drive is the Select trim level with the $2,700 Standard Range Battery - AWD option. Destination and delivery add $1,100 to the price tag, translating to $46,695.

However, take another look at the color. Grabber Blue is currently exclusive to the First Edition and GT trim levels. The former costs or used to cost more than $60,000 because the First Edition is no longer available to purchase new.

Expensive though it may be, the most important takeaway from this crash is that everyone survived to tell the tale. A vehicle can always be repaired or replaced altogether, but a broken bone or internal injuries are far more serious than a few stitches and a phone call with the insurance company.



Editor's note: Euro-spec Mustang Mach-E also pictured in the gallery.

 
 
 
 
 

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