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Aston Martin CEO Says Electric Sports Car Is “Possible”

When Tesla introduced the PxxD dual-motor performance powertrain on the Model S, the world didn’t expect the full-size electric sedan to wreak havoc on the drag strip. But with the second-generation Roadster, the Palo Alto-based automaker headed by the overpromising Elon Musk managed to push the envelope one step further with supercar-rivaling performance.
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Zero to 60 mph is doable in 1.9 seconds, and top speed is estimated at more than 250 miles per hour, making the 2020 Tesla Roadster the most anticipated car of 2020. With those specifications, it’s no wonder the all-new Roadster garnered the attention of the rest of the automotive industry.

Aston Martin is one of the automakers who are willing to take up the challenge, with chief executive officer Andy Palmer making a case for an all-electric sports car. Speaking to Auto Express, the 54-year-old head honcho declared that “it’s possible, yes. There are various challenges involved in making an EV, and the one everyone focuses on is the battery – the management system and the chemistry involved.” In other words, don’t expect anything too soon because of the powertrain’s complexity.

Our first taste of all-electric Aston Martin is the RapidE, the replacement for the Rapide that’s scheduled to enter production in 2019. The go-faster technology comes courtesy of Williams Advanced Engineering, and according to the British automaker, we’d better brace ourselves for “V12-rivaling performance” thanks to an all-wheel-drive setup. Production is limited to 155 examples, and pricing information hasn’t been released yet.

Back on planet Earth, Aston Martin is preparing to bring the DBX to the masses. The first crossover in the Gaydon-based automaker’s history will be available with 48-volt hybrid technology, with Andy Palmer confirming that his company “won’t offer plug-in hybrids. I don’t see the point.” Considering that plug-in vehicles are heavier and more complex than mild hybrids and hybrid cars, this is the right call for Aston Martin.

In related news, Palmer said that it’s “not beyond imagination that Aston Martin could come down to a V6.” Such an engine outfitted with Formula 1-style KERS would be perfect for the Valkyrie-inspired supercar. An inline-6 engine is also worth considering, more so if you remember that Aston Martin, Daimler, and Mercedes-AMG are in cahoots since 2013.

 
 
 
 
 

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