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7K-Mile 1974 Honda CB360G Is Nearly Impeccable, Aftermarket Exhaust Replaces Stock Pipe

Aside from some paint chips and a bit of rust, this Japanese marvel looks as good as ever.
1974 Honda CB360G 30 photos
1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G1974 Honda CB360G
With a modest 7,300 miles (11,750 km) on the clock, the 1974 Honda CB360G we’re about to drool over is still in excellent condition despite its age. Sporting an aftermarket two-into-two exhaust system, Honda’s relic was subjected to a revitalizing service earlier this year.

The bike’s front brake and carbs were overhauled during the refurbishment, while its valves, points and ignition timing have all been adjusted to optimize power delivery. In addition, the current owner proceeded to replace the CB360’s ancient OEM drive chain with a fresher substitute, and the same fate had followed for the battery, fuel lines and petcock.

Within its semi-double cradle framework, this ‘74 MY head-turner houses an air-cooled 356cc parallel-twin engine that inhales via 30 mm (1.2 inches) Keihin carburetors. It comes with a single overhead camshaft, two valves per cylinder head and a respectable compression ratio of 9.3:1. When prompted, the four-stroke mill is capable of generating up to 34 hp, while its torque output digits will plateau at 21 pound-feet (28 Nm).

A six-speed transmission feeds this oomph to the rear chain-driven hoop, and the whole ordeal can result in a top speed of 103 mph (165 kph). Featuring a fuel capacity of 2.9 gallons (11 liters), the CB360G will tip the scales at 392 pounds (178 kg) with a full tank of gas. Stopping power hails from a single 260 mm (10.2 inches) brake disc up front and a traditional drum unit at the rear.

Last but not least, the creature’s suspension comprises 33 mm (1.3 inches) telescopic forks and twin preload-adjustable shocks. This antique pearl is offered at no reserve on Bring a Trailer, and you’d only need about three grand to top the current bid! If this prospect tickles your fancy, then be sure to take action within the next two days, because the auction will end on May 27.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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