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1973 Plymouth Cuda Found Decaying in a Yard, Needs Full Restoration and a New V8

The third-generation Plymouth Barracuda is arguably one of the most beautiful muscle cars ever built, hence its desirability among collectors and classic car enthusiasts. The Cuda was thoroughly redesigned for the 1970 model year and beyond, even giving its Dodge Challenger sibling a good run for its money in terms of looks.
1973 Plymouth Cuda found lifeless in a yard 11 photos
1973 Plymouth Cuda found lifeless in a yard1973 Plymouth Cuda found lifeless in a yard1973 Plymouth Cuda found lifeless in a yard1973 Plymouth Cuda found lifeless in a yard1973 Plymouth Cuda found lifeless in a yard1973 Plymouth Cuda found lifeless in a yard1973 Plymouth Cuda found lifeless in a yard1973 Plymouth Cuda found lifeless in a yard1973 Plymouth Cuda found lifeless in a yard1973 Plymouth Cuda found lifeless in a yard
Between 1972 and 1974, slight changes were made to the exterior, where the grille was now new, flanked by single circular headlights once more. Plymouth then added safety bumpers front and rear for the 1973 models to comply with a new federal mandate at the time. The bumpers make it really easy to identify 1973 model year Cudas, more than any other feature.

The 318 ci unit served as the entry-level V8 engine on these cars. It is a 5.2-liter V8 with a two-barrel carburetor and a single exhaust. Unfortunately for owners of 1973 Cudas, they ended up with significantly less performance than people who owned the 1970 model. The latter’s 318 ci V8 had 230 hp, a figure that dropped to 155 hp for the ‘71 Cuda and ultimately just 150 hp for the 1972 through 1974 models.

The car you see here, for sale on Craigslist, is a 1973 Cuda with a price tag of $4,300. Everything on it seems either rusted or broken (probably both), so be careful if you’re actually interested in purchasing it. It clearly needs a full restoration, with replacement body panels, a refurbished interior, new engine, and transmission—the works.

This car is in bad shape, even by “barn find” standards (technically, this is more of a yard find). Who knows how many decades it’s been left to rot, but we’re guessing more than a couple. Still, if somebody could restore this heap of scrap (for lack of a better term) to its former glory, that would be quite the accomplishment.

Maybe they can even use something like this 1-of-12 Cuda 440 as inspiration.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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