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1966 Ford Mustang K-Code Saved From an Estate Comes With Questionable Changes

Without a doubt, the most desirable engine option on the early Mustang versions was the 289 (4.7-liter) High Performance, also referred to as HiPo.
1966 Ford Mustang 24 photos
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Installed on K-code Mustangs, this particular engine was available beginning with the 1964 1/2 model and continued to be offered until 1967.

It retained its 270-horsepower rating between 1964 and 1967, though, in its last year on the Mustang, it was no longer the most powerful option (the 390/6.4-liter was introduced on the 1967 Mustang with 320 horsepower).

Needless to say, these High Performance Mustangs aren’t necessarily that common, and finding one to restore is much more difficult than you’d be tempted to believe.

This K-code Mustang that you can see in the pics comes from an estate, with eBay seller skia11 explaining the car has been with the previous owner since the ‘60s. However, there’s a chance this Ford Mustang has always been part of the same family, as the car was passed from the father to the son only a few years after the purchase.

Oddly enough, the VIN code indicates this is a ’65 Mustang, but the seller claims it was produced late in the model year, and this is why the title indicates it’s an MY ’66.

The previous owner took the car apart for a full restoration, but at some point, they installed 302 (4.9-liter) heads. The good news is that all the original parts have been retained, so in theory, you still have what it takes to restore this Mustang to factory specifications.

Obviously, this isn’t by any means an easy project, but given it’s a K-code Mustang, quite a lot of people are willing to give it a try. The auction has already received 20 bids, but the top $4,500 offer can’t unlock the reserve just yet.

If anyone wants to see this Mustang in person, it’s parked in Ramsey, New Jersey where it’s waiting for a new owner.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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