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Toyota Plans To TRD Just About Everything, Extend AWD Availability To Camry

Even though TRD stands for Toyota Racing Development, the package has been seen great success with the automaker’s Tacoma and Tundra. The 4Runner TRD Pro is another highlight of the range, but Toyota played a different card with the Camry and Avalon.
Toyota Camry TRD 26 photos
Photo: Toyota
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Presented at the 2018 Los Angeles Auto Show, the Camry TRD and Avalon TRD represent a “holistic approach to vehicle enhancement,” much closer to the motorsport pedigree of Toyota. Both feature 301 horsepower from a 3.5-liter V6 connected to an eight-speed automatic transmission.

Toyota describes these models as “track-tuned” thanks to additions such as the aerodynamic trickery, bigger brake calipers, rotors, and pads, as well as increased torsional rigidity. The design of both the interior and exterior is unmistakable thanks to TRD, but on the other hand, two sedans with go-faster capabilities aren’t enough for the U.S. lineup.

Speaking to Auto Guide, the group vice-president and general manager of Toyota in North America said: “if we can bring it to every car and SUV and every truck, I think we should.” Jack Hollis refers to TRD-ifying everything from the Corolla upwards, which is a fine proposal considering the Corolla TRD would make for an interesting competitor to the Honda Civic Si.

In regard to the Corolla TRD presented at the SEMA Show, Hollis claims the production model isn’t in the pipeline for the time being. On the upside, “there’s intention and development” from his team, which is more or less a confirmation that the inevitable will happen.

All-wheel drive is another area of great interest to Toyota, and “some new things are coming up” according to Hollis. The Camry could be the first to get this option considering Nissan added AWD to the Altima for the 2019 model year. Even the Prius is now available with an electric motor integrated into the rear axle, translating to eAWD at speeds up to 70 km/h (43 mph).

“We’re taking each model, and we’re giving more choices for the consumer,” added Hollis, concluding that the C-HR subcompact crossover won’t receive this option for whatever reason. Looking at the bigger picture, that’s a shame considering the C-HR is available with all-wheel drive and as a hybrid in Europe.
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About the author: Mircea Panait
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After a 1:43 scale model of a Ferrari 250 GTO sparked Mircea's interest for cars when he was a kid, an early internship at Top Gear sealed his career path. He's most interested in muscle cars and American trucks, but he takes a passing interest in quirky kei cars as well.
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