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This Lambo Huracan Took 210 Days to Make, Take a Look at What It Hides Under the Hood

When you don’t have enough money to treat yourself to a Lambo, you improvise. If you’re this guy. The King of Crafts couldn’t have a more appropriate nickname, as he is a true artisan who can create masterpieces from virtually any piece of junk. Take his latest creation for instance: a Lamborghini Huaracan made from an old, abandoned car.
King of Crafts Homemade Lamborghini Huracan 12 photos
King of Crafts Homemade Lamborghini HuracanKing of Crafts Homemade Lamborghini HuracanKing of Crafts Homemade Lamborghini HuracanKing of Crafts Homemade Lamborghini HuracanKing of Crafts Homemade Lamborghini HuracanKing of Crafts Homemade Lamborghini HuracanKing of Crafts Homemade Lamborghini HuracanKing of Crafts Homemade Lamborghini HuracanKing of Crafts Homemade Lamborghini HuracanOld, Abandoned DaihatsuOld, Abandoned Daihatsu
A 5.2-liter, naturally aspirated V10 engine, 640 hp, 600 Nm (442 lb.-ft) of torque, a 7-speed, dual-clutch gearbox, and the ability to go from 0 to 62 mph (100 kph) in just 2.9 seconds. This is what the gorgeous Lamborghini Huracan Evo brings to the table, along with a top speed of 202 mph (325 kph). The carmaker boasts of the sports car being the “evolution of the most successful V10-powered Lamborghini ever”.

The Daihatsu Charade is a Japanese-made supermini car produced from the 70s until the year 2000. It was also made by the Chinese until 2012, with the Chinese calling it Xiali. There’s nothing aerodynamic, sporty, or impressive about the vehicle, which compares in no way whatsoever to the Huracan. No person in their right mind would have the audacity to think it’s possible to turn a Daihatsu into a Lamborghini Huracan, yet the King of Crafts managed to do it and the result is simply mind-blowing.

Just to get an idea of who you’re dealing with here, the so-called King of Krafts, as he goes on his YouTube channel, is passionate about making replicas of the most iconic wheelers out there. Cardboard is one of the main materials he uses, which makes his creations all the more impressive, given that the cars are full-size and drivable. Sure, they can’t hit 200 mph, but that’s not the idea anyway.

The Lamborghini Huracan you see in the images was his latest project, and quite possibly his most challenging one to date. The guy worked on this restoration process for 210 days and he constantly teased us with footage showing his progress. There are 18 videos posted on his YouTube channel, all of them with the Lambo in the works, but now we finally get to see the result. Enjoy!



 
 
 
 
 

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