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RWB Widebody Porsche 911 Speedster Rendered, Would Please Akira Nakai

Modifying Porsche 911s is no small feat, but Akira Nakai has been doing it to worldwide acclaim since the 1990s. The founder of Rauh-Welt Begriff has yet to lay his hands on a special-edition Speedster, but if he will, maybe this is how it would look with the RWB treatment.
RWB Widebody Porsche 911 Speedster rendering 22 photos
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Rendered by Karan Adivi from India, the widebody Neunelfer with a JDM-style temporary plate at the rear, yellow brake calipers, massive wheels, and lowered suspension shows the RWB logo on the carbon-fiber side skirts to bring the point home. The very top of the windshield also pays tribute to Nakai-san with a white-over-black decal reading RAUH-Welt.

Though it’s amazing to look at as a pixelwork of art, the real-world 911 Speedster is too rare for most owners to consider modifying the car to such an extent. Only 1,948 examples of the breed were ever made, sending off the previous generation of the German boxer-engined sports car.

1948 comes from the year the first production Porsche rolled off the line in the guise of the 356, which used to cost $3,750 for the coupe and $4,250 for the convertible back then. In today’s money, make that $39,895 or $45,215 adjusted for inflation. The 911 followed suit in 1964, cementing the automaker’s status as Germany’s premier sports car specialist.

Turning our attention back to the Speedster, it borrows the best bits available from the GT3 Touring but tones them down a little in order to create a more elegant package. The $275k special edition is probably the final aspirated 911 considering what the future holds for the 992 series.

Though not official nor confirmed by head honcho Olivier Blume, GT3 RS is reportedly getting a twin-turbo engine. As much as we love the aggressive and rev-happy howl of the 4.0-liter boxer in the 991.2 series, the truth of the matter is that Porsche needs to adapt.

2021 is when a new emissions target will roll out in the Old Continent, mandating a 95-gram fleet average of CO2 emissions or drastic fines for everything above that value. This is the reason hybridization will slowly but surely come to the 911, most likely with the 992.2 mid-cycle refresh.

For reference, the 992 Carrera is listed in Germany with 9.4 liters per 100 kilometers (25 U.S. miles per gallon) and CO2 emissions of 215 grams per kilometer. On an ending note, a recent spotting of the 992 GT3 pretty much confirms that natural aspiration is on the table. For the time being...

 

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