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Rivian Delivery Vans Will Have Three Derivatives - EDV 500, 700, and 900

We still need to know a lot more about the Amazon delivery vans Rivian has developed. Thankfully, the own company provided more details in its IPO documents, but it took a tweet from Reilly Brennan to discover them. Thanks to him, we now know that the electric van will have three derivatives: EDV 500, 700, and 900.
Rivian revealed all derivatives of its delivery vans in IPO: EDV 500, 700, and 900. 10 photos
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We already knew that the Amazon delivery vans would be called EDVs (Electric Delivery Vans) and that the EDV 700 would have 700 cubic feet (19,822 liters) of cargo space. That means the numbers refer to how much stuff these vans can carry. It also seemed that Rivian would sell only this option. However, now we have the precise numbers and some technical specifications for the entire family.

The entry-level EDV 500 is the only one that offers precisely what its name implies: a storage capacity of 500 cubic feet (14,158 liters). With a range of up to 150 miles, it is 248 inches (6.3 meters) long and has a wheelbase of 157 in (3.99 m). Its GVWR (gross vehicle weight rating) is 9,350 pounds (4,241 kilograms).

That’s the same GVWR for the EDV 700, which also shares the same range with its cheaper sibling. What makes the EDV 700 different is its size and storage capacity. Being 277 in (7.04 m) long and with a 187 in (4.75 m) wheelbase, it can carry 660 ft³ (18,689 l) of cargo. This allows us to compare some aspects of these electric vans to those with combustion engines.

A RAM ProMaster 3500 Cargo Van LWB high roof extended has a cargo volume of 463 ft³ (13,111 l) with a wheelbase of 159 in (4.04 m). It also has a GVWR of 9,350 lb, but it probably has a lower curb weight than the EDV 500. Unfortunately, Rivian did not disclose how heavy its electric vans are.

You get the payload capacity by subtracting the curb weight from the GVWR. Rivian could have revealed it right away, but it didn’t. The ProMaster 3500 Cargo Van LWB high roof extended has a payload of 4,330 lb with its gasoline engine.

With a massive battery pack, it is very likely that the EDVs are much heavier than those with combustion engines. That will make them have a lower payload capacity. The need to constantly recharge will also make them have longer idle times than their ICE competitors. Rivian could have fixed that with a battery swapping system.

The advantage electric vans have is that they will pollute a lot less and last a lot more. With these vehicles running short distances between one delivery and the next, the electric vans will use energy in a much more sensible way than those having to fire up their engines to run a few yards before stopping again.

The EDV 900 is the top derivative. The 321-in (8.15 -m) van has a 205 in (5.21 m) wheelbase, a storage capacity of 840 ft³ (23.786 l), and a GVWR or 14,000 lb (6,350 kg). However, it is the one that gets the least range of all vehicles: up to 120 mi (193 km), which means it will achieve that distance in the best-case scenario.

Rivian did not mention if all EDV derivatives have the same battery packs or if the larger one is equipped with a proportionally bigger component. If it is, the fact that it still gets less range is something to bear in mind. Ironically, these ranges give the expression last-mile deliveries a very accurate sense.



 
 
 
 
 

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