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Play Lego at the Highest Level With This Dismantled, All Numbers Matching Charger 440 R/T

Care for a real-life Lego? Then this all numbers-matching 1970 Dodge Charger 440 R/T might be the biggest challenge for your assembling skills, but get ready for some fixes here and there.
1970 Dodge Charger 440 R/T 15 photos
1970 Dodge Charger 440 R/T1970 Dodge Charger 440 R/T1970 Dodge Charger 440 R/T1970 Dodge Charger 440 R/T1970 Dodge Charger 440 R/T1970 Dodge Charger 440 R/T1970 Dodge Charger 440 R/T1970 Dodge Charger 440 R/T1970 Dodge Charger 440 R/T1970 Dodge Charger 440 R/T1970 Dodge Charger 440 R/T1970 Dodge Charger 440 R/T1970 Dodge Charger 440 R/T1970 Dodge Charger 440 R/T
Dodge introduced the second generation of the Charger in 1968 and built it until 1970. It made a few changes for the 1969 and the 1970 model years, but the coke-bottle design remained the same. Moreover, the 440 R/T version was still an upmarket vehicle, meant to dominate not only the drag-strips but also the NASCAR scene. The latter was a more complex problem and couldn't be achieved until Dodge made the Daytona version. But, for the quarter-mile run, the regular 440 R/T was a terrible weapon.

The carmaker introduced a few significant changes for the 1970 R/T, such as the wrapped-around chromed bumpers and the single-piece grille, without the divider in the middle. Moreover, the rear panel for the taillights looked better than on the rest of the Charger range. Finally, Dodge understood that the regular bucket seats were not suitable for racing and introduced the high-seatback version ones fitted as standard for this muscle car.

Considering this, the 1970 Charger 440 R/T became a dream for many car collectors. Some of them were sold recently at six-figure prices. But this one is much cheaper even though it comes with numbers matching everything.

What you see in the main picture above is how this car was before it was disassembled. It doesn't look like that anymore, and this might be a good thing. Usually, when buying a survivor and planning to restore it, the owners have to take it apart piece by piece and inspect everything. The manni.salva seller offers the car on eBay for a hefty 65,000 USD price. It might be a steep price for a non-working vehicle. We know that the car worked before it was dismantled a decade ago but obviously doesn't run anymore.

The bodywork is complete, yet it needs some metal work and a full paintjob. The interior needs to be restored as well. We don't know how the engine has just 46,000 miles on it, so if it is stored correctly, it should run very smoothly. But that you may find out by contacting the seller. Yet, it is vital that everything is numbers-matching, so even after a 40,000 investment in fixing and reassembling the vehicle, the buyer will still have a great deal in their driveway. This is not the kind of car to be kept as a garage queen. It was built to paint with some rubber on its long quarter panels.

But, for now, the car is dismantled, and all parts are stored in labeled crates. Moreover, the entire process was documented thoroughly with thousands of pictures. The only piece that is missing is the driver's window, which was broken when the car was being taken apart. Finally, the seller also activated the "Make Offer" button, so you might get a deal with something else.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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