autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 

Need a Restomod Candidate on the Cheap? This 1966 Mercury Park Lane Would Do Wonderfully

Restomodding is a rich man's hobby. Or at least, that's what we're led to believe when we see what happens when somebody goes all out on their custom build. But there are, in fact, a handful around who build up old cars on the cheap. One of the best ways to save money overall is to spend a small pittance on the car itself.
Mercury Park Lane 13 photos
Mercury Park LaneMercury Park LaneMercury Park LaneMercury Park LaneMercury Park LaneMercury Park LaneMercury Park LaneMercury Park LaneMercury Park LaneMercury Park LaneMercury Park LaneMercury Park Lane
Such is the case with this 1966 Mercury Park Lane. Depending on your point of view, i.e., glass half full vs. glass half empty, this clapped-out old jalopy for sale via Vail's Classic Cars of Greenfield, Indiana, is either a four-wheeled disaster zone or a blank canvas with limitless possibilities.

While doing a bare minimum of basic research, we used this Mercury's VIN number to find it left a Ford factory in St. Louis, Missouri, a full 56 years ago sporting a 410-cubic inch (6.7-liter) V8. It itself was a stroked variant of the venerable 390-cubic inch (6.4-liter) V8 that found its way under the hood of some Ford Mustangs in the late 60s. Though, of course, this one's had its engine its Multi-Drive, Merc-O-Matic automatic transmission removed to make the job of LS swapping this beauty all the easier.

Unlike most ratted-out old American cars, the interior is looking a fair bit nicer and cleaner than the faded, somewhat ruined state of the exterior paint would lead you to believe it was. All the gauges, switches, and even the grey cloth seats appear to be in frankly stunning condition.

Mileage appears to be an unknown for this Park Lane, as all listings for vehicles without drivetrains appear to say 501 miles each. But at a bargain-basement price of $600, they'll even throw four leaf springs in the front seat so you can get started right away, bringing this classic back from the crypt.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories