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Virtual Ferrari F50 Ditches V12 in Favour of a V8, Feels Weirdly Interesting

What is the best Ferrari ever built? Ask this question in a group of Italian supercar enthusiasts, and you'll receive at least a dozen different answers. A good percentage of those people will probably opt for the F40, others will go for the Enzo, but I'm sure some will choose the F50. After all, we are looking at an F1-derived engine.
Ferrari F50 Ditches V12 in Favour of a V8, Feels Weirdly Interesting 11 photos
Ferrari F50 Ditches V12 in Favour of a V8, Feels Weirdly InterestingFerrari F50 Ditches V12 in Favour of a V8, Feels Weirdly InterestingFerrari F50 Ditches V12 in Favour of a V8, Feels Weirdly InterestingFerrari F50 Ditches V12 in Favour of a V8, Feels Weirdly InterestingFerrari F50 Ditches V12 in Favour of a V8, Feels Weirdly InterestingFerrari F50 Ditches V12 in Favour of a V8, Feels Weirdly InterestingFerrari F50 Ditches V12 in Favour of a V8, Feels Weirdly InterestingFerrari F50 Ditches V12 in Favour of a V8, Feels Weirdly InterestingFerrari F50 Ditches V12 in Favour of a V8, Feels Weirdly InterestingFerrari F50 Ditches V12 in Favour of a V8, Feels Weirdly Interesting
Sure, the F50 is not all about its massive V12 heart. Ferrari built 349 of these vehicles between 1995 and 1997. These cars weighed in at 2,712 lbs (1,230 kg), and drivers had access to over 500 horsepower. The Rosso Corsa cars were the most common ones, with 302 units built in total. On the other side of the spectrum, the Argento Nurburgring and Nero Daytona ones were the rarest, with only 4 units for each color.

These days, an F50 will set you back around $3 million, or even more if we're talking about a car that's in pristine condition. Given the circumstances, it's highly unlikely that we'll ever see a car like this receiving any kind of engine swap. No sane person would forfeit the authenticity of such a legendary machine just for the sake of becoming Internet famous. Not to mention the kind of reaction he'd be met with on behalf of Ferrari.

Thankfully, we live in a digital era, where even the most insane things can be accomplished, at least from a visual standpoint. And so, Abimelec Design decided to go where no man has ever gone before. He started working on a 3D Ferrari F50 and decided to try and break the internet. He removed the naturally-aspirated V12 and opted for a twin-turbo LS-swap instead. He even went as far as painting the engine in Hugger Orange, to show its origins.

He fitted Volk TE37 wheels on the front of the car, while a set of drag radials are present on the rear. Ferrari purists are bound to be upset if they'll ever come across this concept, but I'm sure that any petrolhead would find it weirdly interesting. If someone would build a replica of the F50, powered by this engine, that might not be as upsetting, but the question is: could you still label it as a Ferrari at that moment?





 
 
 
 
 

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