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Near-Perfect 1974 Kawasaki Z1 Demands Almost Twice the Price of a Brand-New Z900RS

Briefly speaking, you’re looking at one of the most prominent two-wheelers developed in Japan during the seventies.
1974 Kawasaki Z1 30 photos
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Hailing from the golden age of vintage UJMs, this 1974 Kawasaki Z1 is still in excellent shape after all these years. Judging by how pretty it looks, you might feel tempted to assume that an all-encompassing restoration must’ve occurred at some point in the past, but the exact details are rather blurry.

The exhaust mufflers found on the left-hand side are said to originate from a later Z1 model, and the two-up saddle appears to have been reupholstered under previous ownership. Back in April, Kawi’s antique legend received new spark plugs, youthful motor oil and a fresh Dunlop Gold Seal rear tire.

Inside its tubular steel double cradle frame, the ‘74 MY Z1A stores an air-cooled 903cc four-banger with two valves per cylinder, dual cams and a quartet of 28 mm (1.1 inches) Mikuni carbs. Joined by a five-speed gearbox and a chain final drive, the engine is good for up to 82 horses at 8,500 rpm.

When the tachometer’s needle touches the 7k-rpm mark, a maximum torque output of 54 pound-feet (73 Nm) will be delivered at the crankshaft. Upon reaching the rear 18-inch hoop, the aforementioned digits can translate into a very respectable top speed of 130 mph (209 kph).

As for the bike’s suspension arrangement, it comprises 36 mm (1.4 inches) hydraulic forks at the front and twin progressive shock absorbers at the other end. Braking is achieved through a single 296 mm (11.7 inches) disc up north and a traditional drum unit measuring 200 mm (7.9 inches) down south.

This iconic UJM is heading to auction on Bring a Trailer, but don’t you expect to get your hands on it for pennies! For the time being, the highest bid is placed at an eye-watering $20,000, and the auctioning deadline will be upon us as early as tomorrow afternoon (June 14).

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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