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Manhart Just Tuned the Hell Out of the Lancia Delta Integrale

Manhart got their hands on the legendary Lancia Delta Integrale. And this is what came out. A one-off vehicle that looks ready to battle any compact sports car out there. 
Lancia Delta Integrale by Manhart 21 photos
Photo: Manhart
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Slap a vintage look onto a new car, and there you go. You’ve got yourself a model that, if you’re lucky, looks classic and classy both. But coming up with modern upgrades to a vehicle that saw the light of day in the 1990s is a whole different story. One that Wuppertal-based tuner Manhart is now ready to tell.

This is the first Lancia tuning project for the company, and it seems that they got it right. The new look reminds us all that, once upon a time, Lancia was a sight to behold in motor racing and car scene in general. Today, the brand has a one-model line up: it only sells the Ypsilon. Unveiled in 1989 at the Geneva Motor Show, the 16V Delta Integrale won the San Remo Rally that exact same year.

The car that the Manhart Classic Car Division worked on was also a 16V version that now has more power, upgraded suspension and brakes, a retrimmed interior, and a brand-new paintwork.

They took a 1990 Lancia Delta HF Integrale 16V with 35,729 miles (57,500 kilometers) on the clock and an engine rebuilt before 963 miles (1,550 kilometers). The 2.0-liter four-cylinder power unit drove out of the factory grounds with 197 horsepower (200 PS) and 220 lb-ft (298 Nm) of torque, a five-speed manual gearbox, and all-wheel drive. Nothing to write home about, by today’s standards. But when the tuning house was done with it, it had gone all the way to 370 horsepower (375 PS) and 405 lb-ft (550 Nm).

To handle that much power, the brakes needed to be upgraded as well. So now the Delta Integrale sports four-piston Brembo calipers and 380-millimeter discs.

Keeping the vintage look of the Delta Integrale was indeed a challenge. They painted it in a military green shade and put on contrasting red and grey stickers. The Lancia badges kept their ground, but they are now in the company of the "Manhart" logo, while the “Integrale 400” lettering showed up on the tailgate.

The original sporty bodykit, as well as the adjustable rear spoiler and smoked taillights and front indicators are also on the menu. The car now runs on period-specific 17-inch alloys by OZ Racing.

On board the Lancia, Manhart came up with seats and door cards in leather and Alcantara. The dashboard kept the retro-style instrument gauges, and there is a Sony cassette player in the center console, but the steering wheel is new.

All these come for quite a price. Those who want to drive it home have to pay 129,900 euros, which translates to $145,239.
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