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Honey, I Stretched the Car! This Is the World's Strangest Dodge Viper

This must be the world's strangest Dodge Viper. It is so long that it barely fits the pictures. The 1996 Viper has been through a major plastic surgery and hardly resembles the car that rolled off the production line 27 years ago.
Stretched 1996 Dodge Viper 18 photos
Photo: Gateway Classic Cars
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Stretched limousine conversions usually focus on luxury sedans like Bentleys and Rolls-Royces or SUVs like Hummers and G-Classes. But Dodge Vipers? Well, not really.

This 1996 Dodge Viper, though, makes you rub your eyes in wonder. No, your eyesight is alright. It's not you, it's the Dodge. From the front, there is nothing strange about it. It has that usual second-generation Dodge Viper front fascia and there are racing strips stretching along the hood.

From the back, it's the same story. The Viper SR II sports the two central tailpipes which replaced the exposed side exhaust pipes of the previous gen. So far, so good. But when you look at it from the side, well… that is a whole different story.

The two-seater came to life as a Dodge Viper RT/10 back in 1996. But something must have happened along the way and the former sports car was eventually converted into what the owner calls a "limousine." It is actually, an open-top “limousine,” which adds limitations to its use.

You can’t take it anywhere before checking the weather forecast. Since it has nor roof, you can’t drive in the rain or cold weather conditions unless occupants wear raincoats or wrap themselves up. Very inappropriate for special occasions, right?

Stretched 1996 Dodge Viper
Photo: Gateway Classic Cars
It is 25 feet long (7.2 meters), and it can carry up to ten people in ten leather seats, all equipped with seatbelts. The original seller, located in Missouri, claimed that there is, though, room enough for twelve. We have no idea where they would fit, but if they say so…

By the way the car looks in the photo gallery, only the front and rear seats are Viper seats. But those at the back were ones for the driver and passenger, since the model is a two-seater. The rest of the seating area are actually benches facing each other, mounted along the side body panels, with no headrests.

The dashboard of the Viper looks pretty much stock. But that is as far as the normality goes. The model now has four doors, two short ones at the front and two others for those at the back.

It is described as being “not just a car, but an experience you’ll never forget.” Imagine arriving in this never-ending Dodge Viper. Nope, there is no chance you could keep a low profile in that. The model is advertised as luxurious, but we have several other adjectives in mind ending with “ous.” Did you say "ridiculous?"

Stretched 1996 Dodge Viper
Photo: Gateway Classic Cars
It is obvious that it is specifically designed for special moments, and surely not as a daily driver. Because it looks like it is next to impossible to maneuver around narrow streets and park in a normal parking spot, in a normal car park. Not to mention the turning circle of this bus-long Viper. But the original listing from last year said that “it drives great.” Sure…

That must explain why the odometer shows a little over 2,000 miles. You can’t possibly drive this train-like Dodge in the cities too much without actually needing to bend it in the middle to go through a corner.

The model is powered by a Molar Dodge Magnum 360-cubic inch (5.9-liter) V8 crate engine, which generates 390 horsepower. The car was originally set in motion by a V10 engine that has to manage to pull all the weight with its 415 horsepower. But considering the extra weight, there is no way this Doge can fool anyone into believing it is a sportscar.

It is not like this stretched vehicle is going anywhere at high speed. The engine is linked to an automatic transmission. Don’t let the six-speed gear shift showing up in the photos fool you.

Stretched 1996 Dodge Viper
Photo: Gateway Classic Cars
The Doge Viper rides on aluminum wheels. It is equipped with power brakes, power steering, and sports a sound system that allows occupants to blast music as if they were at a party on the move, in preparation for the event they are to attend. But parading in such a car means everyone around can see you and listen to the music you play. But, well, we won’t judge.

The model is for sale, once again, at the Saint Louis, Illinois, showroom of Gateway Classic Cars. Last year, the elongated Viper was initially for sale for $160,000. The private seller eventually came up with a discount, selling it for $140,000.

A dealer is now offering it with an additional cost of almost $30,000. Anyone who pays $160,000 for it can drive it home. If they are able to maneuver it. You could instead buy four Dodge Vipers from the 1990s for that money. And you could drive them everywhere, something you could not do with the elongated former sports car.
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