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Honda Civic Type R Joins Australian Police

Honda Civic Type R police car 31 photos
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Even though it’s the fastest front-wheel-drive hot hatchback on the Nurburgring, the Civic Type R also happens to hold its own as a police car. The Honda has just reported for the duty in Australia, joining the ranks for 12 months “as a sponsored community engagement vehicle.”

The NSW Police Force highlights on Twitter to “give a wave” and “take a photo” if you happen to see the car out on the road. Speaking of which, the Fairfield Police & Community Expo will mark the public premiere of the police-liveried Civic Type R.

Doors are open from 10 AM through 3 PM on Saturday, and attendance is free for everyone coming at the show. As expected, the Honda will be joined by highway patrol cars, the tactical operations unit, riot squad, dog squad, mounted police, and even a helicopter.

"The eye-catching design of the vehicle will hopefully be a great conversation starter while on display and get more people, especially younger people, more comfortable with approaching their local police," said Assistant Commissioner Cassar. On the other hand, the Ford Falcon XB GT Coupe 1973 "V8 Interceptor" from Mad Max would start more conversations than a hot hatchback manufactured in the United Kingdom.

The question is, why doesn’t Honda allow the Civic Type R to chase baddies on the motorway? Chances are the Japanese automaker doesn’t want to strain the drivetrain too much, planning to sell the vehicle afterward. Repurposing the VTEC Turbo-engined land missile to a demo car is another possibility.

Up front, the wheels are driven by a six-speed manual connected to a 2.0-liter turbo four-cylinder that’s rated at 228 kW and 400 Nm of torque. Make that 306 horsepower and 295 pound-feet in imperial units, which isn’t bad at all even when compared to the Megane R.S. Trophy from Renault.

If you want a Civic Type R in Australia, better prepare 50,990 dollars plus on-road costs. If you want metallic paint for the exterior, add 575 dollars to the price.



 
 
 
 
 

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